Fort Beaufort Advocate 1864 2 April - June

Saturday, April 2, 1864

THE LONDON AND SOUTH AFRICAN BANK have this day opened a Branch in Fort Beaufort.
Drafts issued on Graham’s Town, Port Elizabeth, and Cape Town.
Bills discounted daily.
All transactions of the Bank are strictly confidential.
Henry ANDERSON, Manager.
25th February, 1864.

BIRTH on the 26th March, at Fort Beaufort, the Wife of Mr. G. F. STOKES, of a son.
April 2, 1864.

THE ELECTION.
The result of the polling for the Members for the Assembly, was declared on Thursday morning by the Civil Commissioner, - the returns from Stockenstrom having been received by the Wednesday night’s post. It will be seen that Mr. W. AYLIFF stands at the head of the poll, Mr. THOMPSON second, Mr. MEYER next, and Mr. STANTON fifth. Messrs. AYLIFF and THOMSON are therefore the members elect according to law. An explanation of the returns will show how easily Mr. THOMSON could have been kept in Cape Town, had the electors not unfortunately split their votes among three candidates, instead of confining themselves to two. There is, however, no use in crying over spilt milk as the saying is, and the district must be content to have one representative in the Assembly, leaving the other to the Kat River Hottentots, by whose votes, and whose votes alone, he has been returned. Only two men of European origin in the whole of the Fort Beaufort district, and probably not more than a dozen in the Stockenstrom district recorded votes for Mr. THOMPSON, and it is therefore true to say that he is peculiarly the elect of the Hottentots, - many of whom, as one or two of the polling books testify, “plumped” for him by giving him two votes, just as they held up two hands each for him on the nomination day. This error has been corrected in the returns, by deducting one vote where two had been given, but we are not sure whether according to the Ordinance double votes thus recorded are not entirely null; - and the Government ought certainly to take measures for the appointment of polling officers of sufficient intelligence, to perform the required duties correctly. However, in the eyes of the law, Mr. THOMPSON is legally one of the representatives of this district, and should he take his seat, as he probably will notwithstanding his expressed dislike to be returned by a clique, he has a right to expect that a fair trial shall be given him. We are disposed to make a virtue of necessity. We opposed his return with all our might, but he has got in, and perhaps may prove after all a good representative.
He has both ability, education, and principle, and although we should have preferred to see a representative of the district with both local and provincial knowledge and sympathies, instead of one with avowed predilections for the West, - we shall be only happy if he disappoint expectation, and shall be as ready to judge impartially his votes and acts on their own merits as those of this colleague.

RESULT OF THE POLL.

FORT BEAUFORT

AYLIFF

MEYER

STANTON

THOMPSON

BAINES

Fort Beaufort

64

39

32

0

0

Kromme

14

14

0

0

0

Winterberg

13

3

10

0

0

Koonap

16

15

1

0

0

Blinkwater

10

1

1

14

6

Adelaide

19

25

3

1

0

 

136

97

47

15

6

STOCKENSTROM

         

Upshire

1

12

13

0

0

Balfour

3

1

0

35

33

Lower Mancazana

22

3

18

1

0

Elands Post

38

15

21

37

26

Phillipton

2

2

0

47

45

Readsdale

0

0

0

20

11

Upper Mancazana

0

0

0

15

3

Buxton

1

0

6

20

2

TOTAL

203

130

105

190

126

REPLY OF THE GOVERNOR TO THE ADDRESS OF THE INHABITANTS OF STOCKENSTROM.
The following reply has been received from the Governor, to the address presented to him by the inhabitants of Stockenstrom, on his recent passage through that District: -
GENTLEMEN, - I beg to acknowledge very gratefully this expression of your loyalty and attachment to Her most Gracious Majesty.
The improvement of the means of communication between different parts of the Colony, and the repression of crime, are subjects which ever occupy the attention of the Government, and I trust that under the influence of a most genial season, and it may be hoped with some improvement of the law, the landowners of the Colony may shortly find themselves relieved from the pressure under which they have so severely suffered for some time past.
Lady WODEHOUSE and myself are deeply sensible of the kindness with which you have been pleased to welcome us on our first visit to Stockenstrom.
P. E. WODEHOUSE.
To J. J. van AARDT, Esq., J. P. BOOYSEN, Esq., and the Inhabitants of the district of Stockenstrom.

MISCELLANEOUS.

MUNICPAL FARM. – On Tuesday the farm granted for the purpose of supplying the means of providing the town with water, was sold by auction as advertised, and knocked down to Mr. C. HOLLIDAY, at an advance of £5 on the upset price. The extent of the farm is 2043 morgen, and the sum realized £4602, being a fraction more than £2.5 per morgen. With Government dues, auctioneers fees, and other expenses, the total sum to be paid will be very near £5,000. A credit of four years was given. We may congratulate the town on having now the means within its grasp to carry out the long contemplated water works, and we may also congratulate the purchaser on the possession of one of the finest farms on the frontier, on very moderate terms.

THE “KAFFRARIAN RECORDER” has ceased to exist, in consequence of not receiving sufficient support from K. W. Town. The proprietor announces that he will be ready to re-publish in April provided the public come forward in the meantime with liberal offers of support.

A NOVEL “REQUISITION” to an M.P. – Eight-four registered voters of Albert have addressed a “Requisition” to one of the recently elected members for that District, F. HOPLEY, Esq., calling upon him to resign his seat on the ground of “ignorance of the statistics of the Eastern Province, his strong anti-English prejudices, his ?? of the wishes of his constituents and his unfortunate unacquaintance with the political necessities of the colony. “We think the electors, whatever truth there may be in their allegations, would have shown more wisdom had they opposed Mr. HOPLEY when nominated five days previously, instead of allowing him to walk over the course without opposition. According to the local Gazette there were a hundred persons at the nomination. Was Mr. HOPLEY’s unfitness not known to those present? – Was there no one present to be found of sufficient independence to denounce him as unfit for a representative? – or was it only on the 16th that it was discovered to “be unsafe to the interests of the community of Albert that he should represent the district?

MR. TRIGAARDT, a farmer of note in the Gonubie district, left East London by the last steamer for Natal, for the purpose, it is said, of viewing that colony with the ultimate intention of settling there. Mr. T. recently purchased three farms in Kaffraria, and as he is a gentleman of means and enterprise, it is to be hoped that the seductive prospects of Natal will not be powerful enough to induce him to change. Mr. TRIEGAARDT took his spider with him in the steamer, and intends to return overland. – K. W. T. Gazette.

A PORT ELIZABETH TRICK. – A farmer from the Kahoon recently sold two bales of wool to a “wol koper” not 100 miles from Cross street bridge in King William’s Town. When the 1st bale was weighed, and the weight called out by the purchaser, the boer fancied there must be some mistake, and knowing his own weight to a lb., he immediately jumped on the weighing machine, and found only a difference of twenty pounds!! Against the seller. The purchaser, finding himself in “queer street,” excused himself by stating that perhaps his scale was out of order, and he would have it adjusted before weighing on it again. – Ib.

THE REDUCTION OF THE CAPE CORPS. – We have received a copy of a general order now being submitted to the detachment of Cape Mounted Rifles stationed in Cape Town. It is understood that none of the officers will join the Frontier Mounted Police Force, and few of the men will do so either – the majority taking grants of land, or volunteering into other corps. The general order from which we extract the following thus refers to the reduction of the corps: - “the local bases of which is the reduction of it by one half: those reduced to be placed on half-pay until absorbed in other regiments. The officers to have the option of accepting as compensation grants of land across the Kei, and to be substituted for Civil Police Force, on the principle of Sir Walter CURRIE’s police, if found qualified. Officers of all ranks to make private arrangements with each other, so that the commanding officer may be enabled to submit their names and wishes to the Governor as soon as possible. The men have the option of volunteering into the police, with a probable bounty of £5, relinquishing all claims on Her Majesty’s service, except such as they may be entitled to at the time of volunteering, - or to accept their discharge and become settlers, with a grant of land across the Kei, or to be discharged in the colony free, or to volunteer into any of the regiments in the colony.”

KAFFRARIA. – A correspondent of the Records, in a letter to the editor, offers a piece of advice to Kaffrarian farmers, viz: - “To get their wool carefully weighed upon properly balanced scales, and then bring an action against those traders who habitually fleece them. I know of some who are determined to put the screw on more than one of those gentry, and who will, the next time they are caught “humbugging the scales.” The Borough authorities have not yet done anything by way of assizing weights and examining scales. This neglect looks ill, considering all things.” He further remarks: “It is reported that the Home Government has acceded to the wishes of the anti-annexation, but pro-convict party, and that Governor WODEHOUSE will try whether his eastern parliament will net annex British Kaffraria, g sharp, to prevent the convicts being sent so near the virtuous old colony. Why is there so much anxiety to increase the number of criminal residents, and none shown to procure a useful and reproductive population to fill the country?

CORRESPONDENCE.
Fort Beaufort, March 23, 1864.
To the Editor of the Fort Beaufort Advocate. –
SIR, - Mr. STANTON sendeth greeting to the Kaffrarian King of the Blarney Stone, and at the same time returns him a Rowland for his Oliver, with interest. But how much it is to be deplored that so much valuable time of the soft soap makers meeting should have been trifled away by such men as Blarney HEWETSON. Surely much better and stauncher men may be found in that great Empire of British Kaffraria, who are capable of advising a public meeting without descending to personality. But Paddy will do well in future to remember that he has lived too long in a glass house to attempt to throw stoned at such independent political characters as Mr. STANTON. Now his Blarney Trumpet may tickle the ears of some of those would-be great men in a small state, but all his oily-gammon about Anti-Annexation* will not go down as the feelings of the landed interest of British Kaffraria. No, no, it’s all bosch served up with Gammon.
I remain, &c.,
W. S.

POSTSCRIPT.

CORRECTION. – The voting in Upper Blinkwater, was supposed to have been included in the Buxton returns when the result of the poll in another column was framed. Subsequently, however, the Upper Blinkwater returns were received, from which it appears that STANTON has 15 additional votes, making his total 120. The following is the correct result of the polling for the five candidates.

 

AYLIFF

MEYER

STANTON

THOMSON

BAINES

Total

203

129

120

190

126

COL. ARMSTRONG, C.M.R., it is said, is to proceed to Natal as Colonel on the staff. This is considered as an indication that head quarters are to be established at K. W. Town.

ASST. COM GEN. KAY, it is reported, is to be stationed at K. W. Town.

LT. GOVERNOR MACLEAN, it is surmised, will shortly retire on a pension of £800 per annum. Sir Percy DOUGLAS will be Lt. Governor of the Province, and reside at K. W. Town, when Kaffraria shall have been annexed.

MAJOR LORD BROWN, will probably leave for Graham’s Town shortly with 200 of the 96th, Head quarters of this regiment, it is reported will be stationed here.

BY THE PORTUGESE SHIP OF WAR MARIA ANNA, which arrived in Simon’s Bay last night, we have received news from Dr. LIVINGSTONE, who was at Mozambique waiting for an opportunity to leave for England, either by the overland route or via the Cape. By telegram from Simon’s Town, we learn that the Ariel, with Dr. Livingstone on board, had left for Bombay with the lady Nyassa in tow. LIVINGSTONE is as confident as ever that the highlands on the banks of the Zambezi offer a splendid field for missionary enterprise, and he leads us very plainly to infer that both the political and the Church mission have been too hastily abandoned.

Saturday, April 9, 1864

NOTICE.
185
Colonial Office, Cape Town,
Cape of Good Hope.
Feb. 25, 1864.
These are to certify that Mr. Petrus LAWRIE has authority from His Excellency the Governor to practise as Chemist and Druggist in the Colony.
By command of His Excellency the Governor.
RAWSON W. RAWSON.
Colonial Secretary.

NOTICE.
The Undersigned hereby warns all persons from Travelling on the Roads or Footpaths through his farm “Ellendale,” adjoining Mr. ATWELL’s, - the said roads or paths being private. Parties so trespassing, their Cattle or Horses will be impounded, and themselves proceeded against according to law. He also warns any one from cutting Thatch, Poles, or Wattles on the said farm.
Parties going to ATTWELL’s Mill are at liberty to use the road running through the centre of the farm, if such road is of any convenience to them, and by obtaining permission from the Proprietor.
James DAVIDSON.

MISCELLANEOUS.

THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL. – Mr. JARVIS has at length deemed it necessary to send in his resignation. Dr. ZEEDERBERG, and Messrs. REITZ, VIGNE and O. M. BERGH are spoken of as suitable successors.

MR. KINNEAR, the Civil Commissioner of the Paarl, has been dismissed from the service, for insolvency.

IT IS STATED that the Colonial Government has conditionally purchased the Castle in Cape Town for £65,000, and that the amount will be devoted to the erection of barracks at King William’s Town and other places. – (Qy. ?).

FOUND DEAD. – From Keiskama Hoek we learn that on Wednesday evening last, at about ten o’clock, a private soldier of the 96th Regt. Was found dead in the aqueduct at the corner of Mr. WHITCHER’s house in that village. A coroner’s inquest was held on the body on the following morning, and a verdict of accidental death returned. The investigation is said to have occupied the board about five hours, a large number of witnesses having been examined. The proceedings have been sent to R. RAYLOR Esq. The man it is reported, was under the influence of liquor at the time. – K. W. T. Gazette.

A MR. SOLOMON (Clerk at MOSENTHAL & Co’s) after almost drowned in the Sunday’s river and then restored to consciousness, died on Thursday evening. Deceased was a brother to Mr. S. SOLOMON, M.L.A.

MR. JAMES, who formerly kept an Hotel at Windvogelberg, in British Kaffraria, and now resides at Sanddrift, was apprehended this morning in Burghersdorp, on a charge of fraudulent insolvency. – Burghersdorp Gazette.

SALE OF LANDED PROPERTY. – Mr. F. SCHERMBRUCKER sold on Saturday last, in the estate of W. WARD, 6 erven with houses thereon situate in the German Village, King William’s Town, and forming one block for £500, and the splendid farm “Blaney,” in extent about 800 acres, for £630. Colonel DONOVAN is the purchaser of the town property, and Capt. HUNT of the farm.

TULBAGH. – FRAUD. – A young Dutchman named TER BRUGGE, hitherto a private teacher, was brought in here a prisoner, charge with fraud. It appears that some time ago this young man purchased a couple of muids of barley from a farmer named Thomas PRINS, of Warm Bokkeveld, for which he paid in cash. Some time afterwards he called on PRINS for a receipt, for man is but mortal, and it was necessary to be punctual in money matters. TER BRUGGE wrote a receipt in pencil, but when the farmer was going to sign it, there was no pencil at hand only ink, and consequently the farmer signed black on white. The pencil-writing was carefully rubbed out with Indiarubber, and by substituting pen and ink writing, the paper was transformed into a promissory note for £50 or £60. The note was cashed at Ceres, and TER BRUGGE some time afterwards entered upon a journey to the Free State, when a warrant was sent after him, and he was apprehended. It is said that the prisoner pleads guilty. He is only about 30 years of age, and was by no means in needy circumstances. Unsuspecting farmers will henceforth do well to take care how they use pen and ink. – Zuide Afrikaan.

POSTSCRIPT.

CAPE TOWN. – A meeting of creditors has been called in the estate of Mr. H. C. JARVIS, ex-member of Council. The liabilities are about £33,000, the greater part secured. It was thought that 15s. in the pound might be expected. Mr. JARVIS was in a very precarious state of health. The well known firm of R. GRANGER & Co., it is also stated, has suspended payment; but the embarrassments of the house are considered to be only temporary.

IT WILL BE SEEN from a communication in to-day’s issue, that our Adelaide friends have made a good commencement towards the establishment of a local agricultural society. – An influential meeting was held at the office of N. MEYER, Esq., on Wednesday last, when the handsome sum of £150 was subscribed on the spot, and the following gentlemen nominated as Provisional
Committee: - Messrs.
N. MEYER,
F. W. POHL,
John POHL,
C. E. POHL,
H. SPARKS,
F. HOLLAND,
R. M. ROBERTS,
J. G. ROUX,
T. CUTTER,
C. LILFORD,
W. A. NEL,
F. DU PLOOY,
W, PEDLAR,
T, NILAND,
C. BLAKEWAY,
J. CROSS, T. MATHEW,
H. VILJOEN,
B. BOOTH,
J. A. RAUBENHEIMER,
H. VAN NIEKERK,
James MILLER,
T. O. BERRY,
John FULLER,
John VICE,
John KING,
A. SIMS,
F. MARX,
G. STOKES,
S. MOORCROFT,
S. POTGIETER,
H. J. LOUW,
H. E. MCTAGGART,
J. MIDGLEY,
E. HENNEMEYER,
H. H. TIPPER,
J. SWEETNAM,
H. ENGELBRECHT
R. W. MURRAY. –
It will be observed by an advertisement in another column, that a meeting of the committee will be held in Adelaide on the 3rd of May. We notice that the same day had been fixed on for the postponed annual meeting of the Fort Beaufort Society, but the committee in Adelaide could not have been aware of the postponement when they selected the 3d. However, one of the committees will likely choose another day, so as not to clash with the arrangements of the other.

THE ELOPEMENT of a European girl with a young Hottentot man is recorded in the Somerset Courant.

MR. J. C. BERRANGE, the son of our Civil Commissioner, died on Saturday morning. He had suffered for about eight days from diphtheria, or white sore throat, which baffled the skill of his physicians. He was only 27 years of age, was in the full freshness and vigour of youth, and was married only four or five months when the malady cut him off from the living. The public sincerely sympathise with his young and disconsolate widow and afflicted parents. – G. R. Advertiser.

ON MONDAY MORNING DIED the Rev. H. LENNON, Roman Catholic Priest. He was sent here about 12 months ago by his Bishop, in the hope that the dryness of the climate would cure him of consumption from which he was suffering. It appears the decease had progressed too far for that. He was only 27 years of age, and had been but two years ordained. It was only his little flock that knew his worth. Requiescant in pace. – G. R. Advertiser.

AN ADDRESS has been presented to Mr. A. G. BAIN by the inhabitants of Grahamstown on the occasion of his visit to England. The Lower Albany farmers also presented an Address to the veteran roadmaker.

THE JOURNAL announces that it has secured the services of the Argus reporter for the ensuing Parliamentary session.

LATEST. – We understand the order issued for the abolishment of the military post to the Graham’s Town and Koonap, has been cancelled. The military post will therefore be continued. The men stationed at the Koonap have arrived here, and the contractor had brought in all his traps – but the latter had scarcely arrived, when orders were issued to re-occupy the Koonap. We suppose Sir Percy found out that much inconvenience would be the result of stopping the military post, hence the counter order.

NOTICE.
Eland’s Post
April 1, 1864.
The Rev. John BOON, in conjunction with the Church Committee, gratefully acknowledge the untiring efforts of the Ladies of Seymour and its vicinity, for their aid in getting up the Bazaar for the purpose of liquidating the debt on the Parsonage at his place.
We, however, deeply regret that the day of sale which opened so auspiciously, should have been clouded by the sudden demise of our respected friend and neighbour, Mr/ Henry GOOLD, and can only say with those more intensely interested – the Lord hath given and the Lord hath taken away, blessed be the name of the Lord.
J. R. LAING
W. AUNGER
Church Wardens

NOTICE.
List of Licences, issued by the Distributor of Stamps, at Fort Beaufort during the Month of March, 1864.

Wholesale Wine Licence

Charles HOLLIDAY

Fort Beaufort

Auctioneering Licence

James VIGNE

do.

Wholesale Licence

James VIGNE

do.

Gunpowder Licence

James VIGNE

do.

Retail Shop Licence

Maria BLOEMFIELD

do.

Game Licence

Alfred MUGGLETON

Katberg

 

H. MUGGLETON

Fort Beaufort

 

W. J. MUGGLETON

do.

 

John T. REILLY

do.

W. H. RAWSTORNE.
Distributor of Stamps.
Stamp Office,
Fort Beaufort, 31st March, 1864.

WARNING.
The Undersigned hereby gives notice, that the road passing in front of his house to and from Alice, is a private Road, and all persons are hereby warned against using the said road without his permission. All persons are also hereby forbidden to trespass in any way on the farm of the undersigned, by hunting, cutting wood, travelling through bye-paths, &.. as he has received much annoyance from natives in those respects, and will prosecute all future offenders. – No outspanning allowed on the farm Vogelgezang.
Isaac A. HARTMAN.
Fort Beaufort, March 19, 1864.

Saturday, April 16, 1864

DIED, at Glenthorne, District of Bedford, on the 7th inst., Mr. John PRINGLE, aged 73 years. Deceased was one of the original settlers of 1820, and earned for himself during his long and eventful life, the esteem of all with whom he came in contact. He was a war friend, and a sincere Christian and his memory will long be venerated by a wide circle of relatives and friends.
April 14, 1864.

PHOTOGRAPHIC PORTRAITS.
Taken daily in the first style of the art on the Premises lately occuped by Mr. STUMBLES, Church Street.
Geo. JUBBER.

MISCELLANEOUS.

A SAD DISASTER. – We learn with much regret that the Water Mill belonging to Mr. James ATTWELL, of Battlesden, near Alice, was totally destroyd by fire on Saturday night. Mr. ATTWELL, and his family were from home at the time, the latter at the sea, and the former assisting in the last melancholy offices to a a relative Mr. John PRINGLE, when the lamentable disaster occurred, which resulted in the total destruction of the fine mill on the Tyumie.
The account of the man left in charge of the mill is, that some of the machinery having got out of gear on Saturday night, he proceeded with a candle to discover the cause. He laid down the light, while he proceeded to examine the machinery, when, he says the curtain around the stones was blown by the wind towards the candle and ignited, and the fire speedily mastered his efforts to extinguish it. The mill is a ruin, and a large quantity of wheat and meal in store, was also burnt. We understand the premises were partly insured in a Graham’s Town office.

A COOL ROBBERY. – One of the most barefaced thefts we have heard of for a long time, was committed by two natives (Fingoes belonging to the Gaga) at Alice on Monday night last. It seems that the principal culprit, is the owner of a wagon and span of oxen, and on the evening of Monday his wagon drawn by four oxen, was outspanned near the drift at Alice. This fact excited no remark, except that it was thought a little singular that only four oxen should be used to draw the wagon. Some time on Monday night, Mr. MCGLASHAN, in the neighbourhood of whose residence the wagon was outspanned, was induced to get up out of bed and go outside, his watch dogs exhibiting a great amount of uneasiness. Mr. McG. Could discover nothing to create apprehension at the time, although he felt surprised that his dogs refused to respond to his call, and so retired to rest again. In the morning Mr. MCGLASHAN discovered that his wool store had been broken open, and a bale of wool abstracted. On examining the ground, he found the “spoor” of the wool bale distinctly traceable, the prominent corner seams leaving indentations in the ground at regular intervals. Following these traces, he arrived at the spot where the wagon with the four oxen had outspanned the previous evening, and where it became evident the wool had been lifted on to the wagon. The spoor of the wagon was then taken up, and distinctly followed on to the Fort Beaufort road, when it was taken on by the police under Sub Inspector CATHERINE. On arriving in Fort Beaufort a little enquiry led to the discovery that a wagon with four oxen, and a bale of wool, had been seen, and further enquiry elicited the fact that the prisoners had sold the wool at Mr. HOLLIDAY’s store on Tuesday for £9. A little while after Mr. MCGLASHAN arrived, and recognised his wool. The prisoners were found with their wagon, which they outspanned in the usual place on the green, and when the Police interrogated them, were most indignant at the suspicions, and showed an inclination to resist apprehension. A blow or two, however, brought the most pugnacious to his senses, and both prisoners were captured and after examination by the Clerk of the Peace, taken back to Alice. We should have mentioned Mr. MCGLASHAN’s two watch dogs, were found dead on the same morning that he discovered his loss of wool, and medical evidence shows that their death arose from strychnine, - the presumption being that the thieves had poisoned the dogs in order to commit their theft with safety – a fact, which argues a very great deal of premeditation on their part, as the thieves must not only have made themselves acquainted with locality of the premises and the watchfulness of the dogs. But must have taken some pains to obtain the poison. It appears, that the principal thief, Jacob TAMBOULLY, is to undergo his trial on a charge of theft at the next Circuit Court at Alice, his trial by means of his counsel having been postponed on some grounds at the last Circuit, and the prisoner allowed out on bail. It is surmised, not unreasonable, that the present theft was committed in order to obtain funds to a “fee counsel” at the approaching Circuit. This is robbing Peter to pay Paul, with a vengeance.

HOUSEBREAKING AND ROBBERY. – The contractors stores were broken into on the last night of the old contract, and a quantity of things stolen, consisting of bread, meat, tea, sugar, &c., to the value of £12. A whip or sjambok and a knife were also stolen, and by means of those articles, which were seen a few days after and recognised by Mr. HENMAN, contractor’s agent, the theft has been traced to three or four men of the Cape Corps, who have been apprehended, and are now in custody, awaiting examination. On the night of the robbery three or four men were met by one of the constabulary, loaded with bundles which they carried in the direction of the cavalry barracks, and on being challenged one of the thieves brandished a knife, which induced the constable to call for aid, on obtaining which the men were followed, but lost sight of at a corner. The sentry, however, saw the men, and recognised one of them, by which means the four now in custody were apprehended.
Some of the bread and meat stolen, were traced to that respectable sanctuary, the Brak River. – On Saturday or Sunday night last, the premises of Mr. MALLETT, at the corner of Campbell street, were broken into, through the window, and sundry articles of clothing stolen. The thieves broke the lower part of the outside shutter, and then removed a pane of glass, and by that means effected an entrance.

MAGISTRATE’S COURT. – On Monday, Private HILL of the C.M.R., imprisoned on the suspicion of being concerned in the murder of Private WOLVERT, of the same corps, some thirteen months ago, was brought up, and, at the instance of the Clerk of the Peace, discharged from custody, - the evidence procured, or procurable, not being of a nature to bring the charge home to the accused. The testimony of the Hottentot, women was inconsistent, and consisted mostly of hearsay, which when traced as far as possible resolved itself into nothing that of itself could weigh against the prisoner in the minds of an impartial jury.

GILL COLLEGE. – Eighteen subscribers to the Gill College Fund, residents of Somerset, have notified in the Somerset Courant, that as they subscribed on the understanding that no blacks were to be admitted to the College, they withdraw their names and subscriptions, in consequence of it being the intention of the Trustees to admit blacks to the institution.

THE CALEDON ELECTIONS. – A Correspondent, a considerable landed proprietor in the district of Caledon, has sent us the following analysis of the votes in that district for the different candidates, by which it appears that our of the 402 who voted for SILBERBAUER, 426 were Hottentots, Mozambiques, and others, from the institutions; and that out of the 431 who voted for GAIN, 412 were of the same description of people. But nearly the whole of VIGNE’s supporters were men of respectability, landed property, and intelligence throughout the whole district. The farmers have alone themselves to blame for this miserable result, not one third having come to the poll. – Argus.

WE RECORD WITH MELANCHOLY FEELING, THE DEATH, after a long and eventful life, of one of our most highly repsected frontier colonists. Mr. John PRINGLE, of Glenthorn, Bedford. The deceased was the only surviving brother of the Poet PRINGLE, who came to this colony in 1820 as the head of a part. Mr. John PRINGLE, was well known throughout the length and breadth of the land, as an energetic, enterprising and persevering farmer, one whose influence and example has exerted a marked effect on the moral and material welfare of his adopted country. The vicissitudes to which the early settlers were subjected, were largely shared by the deceased, but he proved himself to possess no ordinary share of the stamina which enabled the Pilgrim Fathers to combat so heroically and successfully the frequent and uncommon hardships which fell to their lot in the earlier days of the settlement. Deceased was a model man in many respects, and though he suffered severly by he incursions of the natives, he was a strenuous and consistent supporter of every means calculated to elevate, instruct, and raise them in the scale of civilization. In his pursuits, as a farmer, deceased united a high degree of intelligence with enterprize, and his exertions and success greatly stimulated his neighbours in that course of material prosperity, which enabled them to make so credible an exhibition of the resources of the country at Bedford Fair, where the eldest son of the deceased was awarded the prize for wool. The latter days of the deceased were unhappily clouded by extreme prostration the result of a severe contest with early trials, but as his end approached, the formant faculties appeared revivified, and he contemplated with hope and confidence the approaching end for which his life had in a manner been a long preparation.

A PARAGRAPH is going the round of the frontier papers, to the effect that Mr. KINNEAR has been dismissed from the Resident Magistracy and Civil Commissionership of the Paarl on account of his recent insolvency. This is not so. The circumstances in which the insolvency occurred were known to the Government before Mr. KINNEAR’s appointment, and we are informed that they are now adjudged by the authorities to be such as exonerate him from special blame of a kind which would justify his removal from office. Mr. KINNEAR will therefore be continued in his present post. – Adv. & Mail.

THE ROAD OVER THE KATBERG. – We are informed on good authority that the new line of road over the Katberg is open for carts, etc., by command of His Excellency the Governor, who remarked to Mr. BAIN that travellers had experienced sufficient inconvenience from the bad state of the road, and that as the new line was passable for carts etc. it would be as well to allow travellers to pass that way without delay. – Free Press.

A SCENE IN THE DUTCH REFORMED CHURCH AT CRADOCK. – There is a story current among the farmers in this district, that a few weeks ago, as Mr. du PLESSIS, minister of Cradock was breaching to a crowded audience, a farmer resident in the Tarka, happened to be sitting in the aisle on a low stool. The minister gave out a hymn to sing, - the farmer stooped to look for his spectacles which had fallen down, when a lady suddenly brushed past, his head became entangled in her hoop, threw him from his seat, and when he was assisted to rise he could hardly recover his breath. Who will sit in an aisle after this? – Communicated.

ARRIVAL OF THE MAIL STEAMER - PER ELECTRIC TELEGRAPH. Tuesday Morning, 9 a.m.
The mail-steamer Cambrian, Capt. LADDS, arrived here last evening. She brings the following passengers for Table and Algoa Bays: -
Mrs. THOMSON and two children,
Dr. And MRs. DUNSTERVILLE.
Mr. C. DUNSTERVILLE,
Mr. G. DUNSTERVILLE,
Miss DAVIS,
Miss PATERSON
two immigrants.
Port Natal: -
Dr. and Mrs. CASSALIS,
Miss DUMAS,
Mr. REVAL,
Black servant,
Mrs. MARKHAM,
Mr. PIKE,
Mr. A. J. TURNER
Mr. BLAKER.
Table Bay: -
Mr. SOLOMON,
Mrs. KRAMSHAW and child,
Mr. and Mrs. ADAMSON,
Capt. BLYTH,
Miss PULLEN,
Mr. SCHWANN,
Mrs. JEFFREYS and infant,
Mr. S. JEFFREYS,
Female servant,
Mr. HODGSON,
Mr. CLUTTERBUCK,
Mr. WHITTAKER,
Mr. and Mrs. REICHELT,
Rev. Mr. van WARNELL,
Mrs. Van WARNELL,
Miss KENT,
Mrs. WALDESH,
Mr. GRIMWALD,
Mr. ABRAHAM,
Mr. ROGERS,
Mr. HENDERSON,
Capt. BOURN,
Lieut. BROWNE.

POSTSCRIPT.

MR. ATWELL’s MILL. – The machinery and premises were insured for £1,000, and the stock in the buildings for £500. Report says that both these insurances were effected in the Union Fire and Marine Insurance Company of Grahamstown.

MR. THOMAS HOLLAND, late accountant in the Eastern Province Bank, has been appointed Manager of the Standard Bank in Graham’s Town.

A CHALLENGE. – Private James DOYLE of the 96th Regt., stationed at Keiskamma Hoek, offers to run any European in the colony a distance of one or two miles for a sum of not less than £5 a side, to take place in one month from acceptance, and will give or take expenses to run either at King Wm’s Town or Keiskamma Hoek. – K. W. T. Gazette.

FIRE. – The house of a Dutchman, named S. van NIEKERK, was unfortunately burnt to the ground on Sunday last, during the high wind prevailing on that day. It is not known how the fire originated, but the family were just in the act of sitting down to dinner, when the eldest daughter ran in saying the [house] was on fire. The inmates had barely time to escape with their lives, and a few things that were at hand before the whole was in a mass of flame. The poor man has lost almost everything, and having a large family, is left penniless. He had lately returned from Somerset with a new wagon and supplies. These with the exception of the wagon have all been burnt. He had, it appears, but little money, some five pounds, in silver and gold, and this having undergone the test of the fire, has become one mass of melted metal, and is rendered useless as a circulating medium. The case of this man calls for public sympathy. – Ibid

INSOLVENCY OF MR. KINNEAR. – A contemporary announced on Thursday that the Resident Magistrate of the Paarl has been exonerated by the Government from all blame which might be considered as attaching to him out of his recent insolvency; but we have reasons for stating the question was only the consideration of the Executive Council yesterday, and that it is probable the rule of the service will be adhered to. – Argus.

Saturday, April 23, 1864

EXTENSIVE BUSINESS FOR SALE.
Tenders will be received by the undersigned, for the purchase of the Premises and Stock of the late H. GOOLD, at Seymour, Eland’s Post, Stockenstrom. The premises are large and recently erected. The Stock consists of the usual assortment of Groceries, Soft Goods, and Hardware, suited for the Boer trade.
A large and lucrative business has been conducted on the place by the late Mr. GOOLD, for the last twelve years. The present offers a favourable opportunity to any person of business habits and a little capital for realizing a handsome income. The book debts, Promissory Notes, and Mortgage Bonds, may be taken over at the option of the Purchase by Special agreement.
Satisfactory Security will be required to the full amount of the property transferred.
Further information may be obtained from the Messrs. BLAINE Brothers, and from the undersigned.
E. GOOLD.
Curator Bonis,
Eland’s Post, April 19, 1864.

MISCELLANEOUS.

ESCAPE FROM PRISON. – On Saturday last at noon, a prisoner named BENFIELD, committed for trial on a charge of breaking into Mr. Lloyd’s shop, effected his escape from prison by breaking a pad lock, and got clear off. The prisoner was met on Sunday on the Graham’s Town road.

WE ANNOUNCE WITH DEEP REGRET that a vacancy has occurred among the Eastern members of Council by the rather sudden death of the Hon. Joseph CAWOOD, that took place yesterday morning at Collingham. Deceased has been for some time in a feeble state of health. As a mercantile man, his activity and enterprise were great. His natural abilities were of no mean order, and as a politician anxious to advance the interest of the country of his adoption he yielded to no one. His death will be regretted by a numerous family and large circle of friends. – Frontier Times.

THE EX-PRESIDENT PRETORIUS has been summoned by edict in the last “Government Courant,” at the suit of the Trustees of the Bloemfontein Bank, for the payment of the sum of £500 strlg. How the might have fallen!

ARTHUR TWEED, Esq., Clerk to the Civil Commissioner of this town, has been removed to Fort Beaufort, it is presumed as a step towards promotion. His successor is expected to be Mr. BORCHERDS from Port Elizabeth. Mr. TWEED is deservedly respected as a most conscientious and attentive public servant, whose departure from Graaff Reinet will be much regretted. – G. R. Herald.

BISHOP MORAN arrived in Somerset on Saturday evening last from Graaff-Reinet, - wither he had been called through the death of the Resident Priest. 0 His Lordship we believe, held service in Somerset on Sunday morning and left for Grahamstown on Monday. – Somerset Courant.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL. – The news from Grahamstown of the nomination of Mr. COCK of the Kowie, to the vacancy in the Legislative Council caused by the death of the Honorable Joseph CAWOOD, before the lamented deceased was buried, has rather surprised the people of this town. The Bay electors, however, to be even with the City, are about to present a very numerously signed requisition to Mr. Henry B. CHRISTIAN of the well known firm of J. O. SMITH & Co., soliciting him to come forward and contest the seat which the nominees of th avaricious metropolis. We trust Mr. CHRISTIAN will comply with the request of his fellow townsmen, as such experienced practical men in all matters of commerce and finance, are greatly needed at the present time in the Cape Parliament, especially in the Legislative Council. The Midland district should now assist the Bay in preventing the election of a fifth Grahamstown man. – Ibid.

MITCHELL’S NEWSPAPER DIRECTORY. – We have received a copy of this valuable work for the present year, from which we learn that the total number of newspapers published in the United Kingdom is 1,250, of which 71 are dailies. The magazines, including the quarterlies, numbers 537, of which no less than 196 are of a decidedly religious character. The book is accompanied by a newspaper map, showing the character of the journals published in each town.

POSTSCRIPT.

BEAUFORT LAND INQUIRY. – Messrs. MARQUARD and PIERS, the commissioners for the Beaufort inquiry returned to town on Tuesday evening. It is rumoured that the report of the commission will be unfavourable to the principal party concerned. – Argus.

MR. VIGNE, it is thought, will be elected to the Legislative Council without a contest. Dr. WHITE has been solicited to oppose him, but the doctor is pledged to Worcester.
THE CHIEF JUSTICE, the Colonial Secretary, the Treasurer General, and all the officials, left for Algoa Bay in the Cambrian, on the 19th. They are by this time near Graham’s Town. The Cambrian has 100 passengers on board.

MR. BLAINE is mentioned as a candidate for the Council as well as Mr. COCK, in Graham’s Town. The Graaff Reinet people – we beg pardon – the Midland Province, or Midlandia as the region of the Gem is now euphoniously dobbed, inclines to favour the Bay candidate, Mr. CHRISTIAN, “or any other man,” provided he does not hail from Graham’s Town.

BATHURST. – S. B. RIX, Esq., has been appointed District Surgeon, in the room of A. ARENHOLD, Esq., resigned.

THE PLANS FOR THE NEW TOWN-HALL has been decided upon. The plan “Old England” has taken the prize. – Great Eastern.

NEW INSOLVENCIES: April 16,

 

Assets

Liabilities

G. A. BRUNETTE

£7,859 6s. 2d.

£8,134 3s. 6d.

H. C. JARVIS

£7,708 16s 8d.

£22,083 0s 6d.

 

ATTEMPTED POISONING. A negro boy in the service of Mr. MCKELLAR, of Cape Point, attempted to poison his master by putting a quantity of strychnine into his coffee. Fortunately the dose of poison was so large that MR. MCKELLAR detected it at once. – Ibid.

Saturday, April 30, 1864

FANCY TOBACCONIST.
The Undersigned having opened a Shop in the above line, on his premises in Campbell-street, begs to inform the Public that he has every requisite for Smokers, and hopes by constant attention to his customers, and keeping a good selection of Goods of the best quality, to merit a share of public patronage.
On Hand, a good supply of Bent and Straight Brier-root Pipes, Horn and Amber Tips, Violet Wood do., and other Fancy Pipes; Tobacco Pouches, Tobacco Jars, English and American Tobacco Cutters, Mouth Pieces, Pipe Covers, Pipe Stems, Crystal Lights, Fuzees, Cachou, Aromatic, or Smoking Pills, Clay Pipes, &c. &c.
Cigars – Havannah shape Manillas, Manilla Cheroots, Regalia Cigars.
Tobacco – Superior Golden Leave Tobacco in stick, best 10 stick and ½ lb lumps, and Boer Tobacco.
Always on hand – Pure Golden Leaf, or Mixed, Fresh cut up on the premises, to be retailed in any quantity however small.
M. A. ROCHAT,
Campbell Street, Fort Beaufort.

MISCELLANEOUS.

THE TOWN had a very quiet aspect during the week – a number of people having left for Graham’s Town to be present at the opening of Parliament – and others having started for K. W. Town to be present at the races.

THE COUNCIL. – A Requisition has been signed in this town to W. Cock, Esq., to become a candidate for the vacancy in the Council. A stir has also been made on behalf of Mr. CHRISTIAN, but we have not heard of a requisition to this gentleman.

MUNICIPAL MEETING.
Tuesday evening, April 26th, 1864.
Present. – Mr. LLOYD (in the chair),
Messrs. VIGNE, SCOTT, and QUIN.
The minutes of last meeting read and confirmed.
Mr. J. DUFFY complained of the obscene conduct daily carried on in the old ruin belonging to VAUGHAN’s estate, which was also a filthy nuisance in other respects. –
Resolved that a formal complaint be made to the Wardmaster of the Ward, who would inspect the building and report thereon.
Resolved, that the surveying committee be empowered to make arrangements for the survey of the land ceded by the War Department in exchange for the rifle range, for the purpose of obtaining title thereto; - and to have the same subdivided into allotments of such size as they may deem convenient for the sale thereof. Also, that the committee be empowered to have all land granted for the erection, &c. of a town hall, subdivided, with a view to carrying out the object for which the grants were made.

CIRCUIT COURT – CIVIL CASES.
The Civil roll was called on Friday, the 22nd inst. The number was very small, the few provisional cases entered having been settled or withdrawn, leaving only three contested cases of any interest, one of these CROSS vs. NILAND, for trespass, having been referred to the arbitration of the Hon. Geo. WOOD, by mutual consent, before it was called; another, HUTTON vs. ROBERTS in which the question in dispute was the extent of the liability of a principal to a third party for the acts of his agent, was postponed in consequence of a principal witness of plaintiff being unavoidably absent; and the third, WIGGELL vs. BOTHA, for £500 damages for trespass, was the only civil case tried by the Court. This was a very important trial, and occupied the Court from the afternoon of Friday till the afternoon of Saturday.
WIGGEL vs. BOTHA.
Plaintiff complained that the defendant had trespassed on this farm Thornhill, and had inflicted damage by cutting down timber on the said farm, wherefore plaintiff prayed that defendant might be restrained from further trespass, and pay as and for damage sustained the sum of £500. Defendant pleaded the general issue, denied that the ground on which the alleged trespass was committed on the property of plaintiff, maintaining that it was Crown land, and that no trespass had been committed, said defendant having duly obtained a licence from Government to cut timber on the land in question. The case was brought on the last Circuit Court, but was postponed for the purpose of taking the evidence of Mr. Cooper, Government Surveyor, by commission, and in order to give the Crown, whose rights were implicated, an opportunity of intervening. The Crown did elect to intervene, and was represented at the trial by Advocate DENNYSSEN. – Advocate BARRY appearing for the defendant, and Advocate COLE for the plaintiff.
Evidence was led by plaintiff to show his right to the ground included in his title, and to prove that trespass had been committed by defendant, and damage sustained.
For the defendant evidence was adduced to prove that the ground in question was Crown land, - that it formerly belonged to HERMANUS, and formed part of the Kat River Settlement, - and that although it appeared included in plaintiff’s title to Thornhill, it was erroneously granted; - further, to prove that defendant was acting under a license obtained from Government in cutting timber, on this piece of ground, and that the only two or three trees in all were cut.
The Crown intervened, and endeavoured to justify defendant, and establish its own title to the ground.
The evidence was most voluminous, and the arguments of the several advocates very ingenious, but plaintiff fully established his right, and obtained judgement against the Crown and defendant. The gist of the case is so plainly evident from the summing up of the Judge, that it would be unnecessary to publish the lengthy evidence, or the arguments of the counsel. It will be sufficient to the comprehension of the principle involved to give the remarks of the Court.
In delivering judgement, Mr. Justice WATERMEYER said, - In this action the question of legal right has been raised, - as to the matter of feeling, it must be dismissed from both sides. The plaintiff claims damage because of trespass committed on his property. BOTHA, the defendant, pleads the general issue, pleading besides that he was justified in cutting wood where the trespass was alleged to have been committed, because the ground was Crown Land. The Government intervened, pleading the general issue, - that this land claimed by the plaintiff did not belong to his farm Thornhill; likewise pleading certain sale of Crown land, from which it is inferred that the ground between BOTHA and plaintiff’s farm, still belongs to Government. This is the main question. The question of damages, if any, is quite subsidiary. The plaintiff claims by virtue of a title granted under the hands of Sir Harry Wakelyn SMITH, on behalf of, and as representing Her Majesty – “I do hereby grant, “&c. And to this grant is attached a diagram – both are one. It must be presumed that the diagram corresponds with the deed, both were issued by the Government. Instances have occurred in which a great difficulty has arisen by reason of the disagreement of the title deed and diagram. Disputes have arisen from this cause, and in consequence of erroneous grants, the legislature has deemed it necessary to provide a remedy; but happily the present case did not belong to this class. In this case the picture attached to the title, was a true picture of what the grant professes to give, and there could be no doubt whatever, that what is granted includes the piece of ground in dispute. It was said that it was never intended to include this ground in the title of the plaintiff’s farm Thornhill. There may be means of cancelling an erroneous grant, but as the case stood before the Court, there was no error in the title or diagram, and both agreed with the general plan. It was true that evidence had been brought forward to show that JOUBERT, the original grantee of Thornhill, did not claim the ground in dispute, and it was also shown by GROEPE that the Kat River Settlement had been defined to extend to the road between Hermanus Kop and Fordyce Vlei. It was further proved that when JOUBERT sold his rights in the farm Thornhill to WIGGELL, he laid no claim to this piece of forest ground. If a question had arisen between persons who had a prior right to WIGGILL to the land in question, it would have been entertained by the Court. If it had been shown that the grant for WIGGILL has been posterior to a grant of the same ground to some other person, the case would have been entirely different. But this had not been shown. It might be conceded that if HERMANUS had not rebelled, the ground would have belonged to him, and GROEPE’s evidence on this point was quite correct, although the nature of HERMANUS’s claim was not shown. But it was contended that after HERMANUS’s rebellion, this ground reverted to the Crown. If title reverted to the Crown, so that the Crown could grant or sell, it was clear intervening title could not be set up by the Crown to land granted by its own deed. This doctrine was plainly set down in SMITH’s notes, (Estoppel) in the case of the Duchess of Kingston. No man could be allowed to dispute his own solemn deed. This being so, and there being no doubt that what was granted agreed in title and diagram, and was granted by the Crown, he was bound to respect the title before him, and not to consider it a mistake.
If it was erroneous, steps might be taken to set it aside or have it rectified. But there was nothing in the pleadings to show that the grant was an error. The spot or place where the trees were cut down, was within the grant, within the diagram. The Court had nothing to do with what JOUBERT sold to the plaintiff, all he had to consider was the evidence before him. It was proved a trespass had been committed, and the plaintiff had clearly a right to bring an action. But it is said that when defendant bought his farm at the sale of Government land in 1859, if the adjacent proprietors had objected to the boundaries as described in the Government Gazette, the sale would have been stopped for the time being until an investigation had been instituted. If adjoining proprietors found the Government had advertised any portion of property for sale to which they laid claim, there would have been some force in this argument, and to have remained passive would have imperilled their rights. But in the present instance there was no reason shown why plaintiff should have protested against the sale. The mere fact of Crown land being mentioned as the boundary on one side of the farm purchased by the defendant BOTHA, was not sufficient to make it incumbent on plaintiff to lodge an objection. It was no for any one note claiming any portion of the land to be sold to object. This was not a case in which continuous proprietors claimed the same piece of land, but a case in which one proprietor having purchased ground, finds that instead of its being bounded by Crown land, it is bounded by land claimed as private property. Defendant BOTHA, had received notice that the land described as Crown land, was claimed by plaintiff, but notwithstanding goes into Fort Beaufort and obtains a licence to cut timber, and if the evidence is correct, did cut trees on the ground claimed by plaintiff. BOTHA had received notice that he was trespassing on private property, and consulted an agent, who appeared unfortunately to have advised him to obtain a licence. If instead of doing this, a little trouble had been taken to compare the diagrams of plaintiff’s and defendant’s farms together, it would have been at once seen that they fitted each other exactly, and that there was no Crown land between them, and that what was described as Crown land should properly have been designated Thornhill farm. The present action would thus have been avoided. Mr. BARRY was right, in maintaining that no ill feeling had been exhibited on the part of his client – but he had notice in law, - and it had been fully proved that trespass to the extent of cutting a few trees had been committed. As between the Crown and plaintiff, the Crown was estopped by its own act from setting up a claim to the disputed ground. And the defendant BOTHA by the same circumstance and the same powers, is also estopped. It was unfortunate that Crown lands had erroneously been described as the boundary of the defendant’s farm, - but the Crown could not plead that it was kept in the dark. There was the public registry of all titles, - public instructions had issued from the Surveyor General’s Office, and it must be presumed that the Crown ought to exercise the same vigilance in respect of its rights as private individuals. Much damage has not been proved. Plaintiff had not been able to show a great deal of real damage, - the evidence adduced on this point has been vague. The estimate made by witnesses for the defence, of the value of the timber cut (£5) was probably correct; but still he quite agreed with the counsel for the plaintiff, that something more than the intrinsic value of the trees cut should be awarded. The plaintiff might not wish to have those trees cut down, and the fact of trespassing on his property and making slip-paths, should also be taken into account. The plaintiff fully had established his right, and he thought taking
All the circumstances into consideration that if he gave judgement for plaintiff for £20 damages and costs, he should be doing justice to both parties.
The question was immediately raised between the Counsel for the Crown, as an intervening party to the suit, and the Counsel for the defendant, as to what proportions, if any, of the damages and costs should be borne by the original and intervening defendants. The question was not decided in court, but his Lordship intimated, that he would make an order should the question be raised on the taxation of the bills of costs.

POSTSCRIPT.

SUDDEN DEATH. – Mr. Isaiah TITTERTON of the Bay, expired suddenly of heart disease on the 25th.

MR. CHASE, M.L.A., we regret to learn, is dangerously ill, and his recovery almost despaired of.

INSOLVENCY. – Bernjamin SOLOMON, of Bedford, general agent, - assets, £4301; liabilities, £7320; Deficiency, £3019.

Saturday, May 7, 1864

MISCELLANEOUS.

MR. SUTHERLAND, accountant of the London and South African Bank has, we understand, been appointed manager of the Fort Beaufort branch of this bank.

THE DEATH OF MR. GREENAWAY, says the Burghersdorp Gazette of Saturday, cashier of the Frontier Commercial and Agricultural Bank of Aliwal North, took place rather unexpectedly on Thursday last.

MR. R. W. H. GIDDY was elected to the vacant seat in the directorship of the F. B. & V. Bank, on Tuesday.

MILITARY. – On Tuesday a company of the 96th Regt. Marched into town from the Keiskama Hoek, headed by the C.M.R. Band. On the following day one of the companies of the 96th left to occupy the place of the company which had arrived the previous day.

HEATHEN DANCES. – For the last two or three weeks a very edifying ceremony has been practiced at the Brak River, beyond the drift, near the highroad at the entrance to the town. A number of Kafir youths, the majority having been for years in service among the inhabitants, are preparing themselves according to the Kafir customs for the assumption of the rights and dignity of manhood. There are some fifteen or sixteen of these “amapootas,” as we believe they are called, who day and night disport themselves, surrounded by women, in their grotesque and scant costumes, the ceremonies being superintended by a son of the chief MACOMA, who is either a pensioner or paid officer of the Colonial Government. On Sunday last, some hundreds of natives, men and women, assembled to witness the lewd dances, the majority of the women being servants in the town, and many of them with young children in charge. The sight was certainly a conclusive proof of the fitness of the people for the rights of citizenship, with which our paternal government is so anxious to invest them, and we only regret His Excellency the Governor and the Attorney General had not an opportunity of witnessing the spectacle on the threshold of a civilized town.

CHARLES WINSSELL, Esq., M.D., has been appointed to be district surgeon of Alice, in the room of S. SPRANGER, Esq., resigned.

SIXTY-TWO LBS. AT 7½D. – A stone weighing 62 lbs., was found by one of our merchants, a few days since, nicely placed in a bale of wool which was purchased by him from a farmer at 7½d. per lb. We are sorry to say that the merchant does not know from whom he bought this particular bale. – Ib.

FARMING WITH OSTRICHES. – A few weeks since we noticed that Messrs. von MALTITZ Brothers, of this district had commenced farming with ostriches. Mr. von MALTITZ informs us that he plucked the feathers off fourteen last week and got 526 feathers. – Ib.

SALE OF FARMS. – Those two magnificent farms known as Beggar’s Bush and Rockwood Vale, situated within a few miles of the city, and the property of the estate of the late Mr. J. CARLISLE, were put up by Mr. P. POTE at public sale this day. According to diagrams they measured about 3,145 acres, and the terms specified at the sale were decidedly easy – the term of credit extending over five years; sic per cent interest. The highest bid was only £2,735 for the whole property, a sum considerably below what it was expected to realize; and, consequently, the property was declared not sold. – Journal.

THE SYNODICAL COMMISSION OF THE DUTCH REFORMED CHURCH. – On Saturday the Commission was engaged in the consideration of the Rev. Mr. HAM’s case, which, pursuant to a resolution of the meeting, took place with closed doors. Dr. HOFMEYR gave notice that the members who were specially appointed to examine the documents in this case having come to the conclusion that the discord existing between the minister and his parish was of such a nature as to afford no hope whatsoever, of the Rev. Mr. HAM being able in future to be of any utility in his community, had endeavoured to come to an arrangement. They (the members) stated that such arrangements had been made; the minister having resolved to resign, and some members of the congregation having pledged themselves to provide for his maintenance during the next ensuing three years. After this, Dr. HOFMEYR proposed the following motion, which was seconded by the Elder GIE, and unanimously carried: “The commission express their great satisfaction with this measure. They are, therefore, of opinion that it is not necessary to enter any further into the first ten points of accusation relating to the discord in the community. The commission likewise do not wish to enter upon further examination of the charge of intemperance, which some of the members though to be necessary, and consider that it will suffice to state that the conduct of the minister was of such a nature as to render not unnecessary an earnest warning to him to behave in future with the greatest circumspection.” The Rev. Mr. HAM being called before the commission, the above resolution was communicated to him; and the Praeses, in doing so, entreated him to seek for grace to enable him to avoid even the appearance of sin, and always to behave worthy of the high calling of a minister of the Gospel. On Monday, the commission held an evening session at which it was resolved to communicate to the Rev. Mr. BURGERS, of Hanover, that the commission required some minute declarations as to the misunderstanding between him and his congregation (if there be any); and that they also wished some unmistakable declarations as to his belief concerning the following points of doctrine, namely, - the personality of the devil, the sinlessness of Christ’s human nature, the resurrection of the dead, and the permanent existence of the soul after death. These declarations to be sent in writing before the adjourned meeting to be held in July next. – It was also resolved to give the Rev. Mr. KOTZE, of Darling official notice of the judgement in his case, and Dr. HOFMEYR and Elder GIE were appointed a deputation to acquaint the community of Darling with the true state of affairs as to their minister. After some more business of a merely formal nature, this meeting of the commission was brought to a close with prayer by the Rev. Mr. ALBERTYN, of Caledon. – Adv. & Mail.

MEETING OF CREDITORS. – At the meeting of creditors in the estate of Mr. A. WELSFORD, held on Wednesday afternoon, it was resolved that Mr. WELSFORD be allowed to work the estate out under the supervision of Messrs. SCHABBEL and Chas. JONES. The deficiency is barely £700, and the probability is that the estate will yield a speedy dividend of at least 10s in the pound. – E.P. Herald.

ADELAIDE.
(From our correspondent)
It is not often that exciting events occur in our rapidly rising town, but on Monday last, when a meeting was held to elect five Commissioners in the room of those who lately resigned, Adelaide was in a state of great commotion. The meeting was convened in the office of N. MEYER, Esq., J.P., and at the appointed hour a good sprinkling of our Dutch friends were in attendance from the country, no doubt with the intention of thwarting the re-election of the old Board. As it was generally known throughout the town some days previously, that the same men would be re-elected, and under the impression that there would be no opposition, very few of the inhabitants attended. Your readers are already aware of the cause of the old Board resigning, namely, the refusal to give more than a paltry rate amounting to £75, to complete works that would cost about £400. Of course it was not to be expected that five gentlemen could waste their time once a week deliberating over the expenditure of the insignificant sum of £75, and the commissioners regarded the passing of such a rate under the circumstances as an insult, and resigned accordingly. The meeting was duly opened by the J.P., reading the advertisement, after which it was proposed by Mr. R. M. ROBERTS, and duly seconded, that “Messrs. N. MEYER, H. SPARKS, C LILFORD, T. HARROD, and C. POHL (all the old Board) be re-elected as commissioners,” – the proposer justly eulogising these gentlemen for the good they had accomplished while in office, visible in the great improvements to be seen in the town, and hoped that the meeting would show its good sense by supporting him to get these gentlemen re=elected. Mr. F. HOLLAND then rose, and proposed four other names, at the same time commenting on the old Board, and their extravagance in a young town like Adelaide. The speech was not savoured much, because the extravagance alleged was supported by the speaker himself while in office. Mr. W. POHL also addressed the meeting, but as he spoke in Dutch I was not able to catch the purport of his remarks.
The feelings of those present, however, now began to be ruffled, and before many minutes there was such a babel of tongues that it was impossible to go on with the business. The chairman at last succeeded in restoring order, by virtue of his authority as one of Her Majesty’s J.P.’s. Some 10 or 15 minutes was then occupied in proposing and seconding nominees for the Commissionership until the names numbered 18 or 20. A poll was then demanded, and it was agreed to keep it open until 5 o’clock, and scrutineers were appointed. Why, sir, you talk and write about your elections for the Cape Parliament, but they were insignificant when compared with the excitement which we manifested in the election of our Commissioners. I can assure you there were no open houses, or carriages flying about to pick up voters, but I believe the opposition parties had a few spare horses which were no spared to fetch up all the “lame, lazy, and blind,” to the poll. Precisely at 5, the doors were closed, and after half and hour’s work, the scrutineers announced to the anxious multitude outside, the result by which the Old Board were all elected by a sweeping majority of 3 to 1. Three hearty cheers were given in honor of the success, and all separated to ponder over the victory – gained I assure you, without the loss of one drop of blood - which was more than I expected at one part of the proceedings. Great things are spoken of the Old Board, and greater things are looked for now that they are re-elected.

POSTSCRIPT.

ACCIDENT. – Mr. BOVEY’s carriage was unfortunately capsized in turning an angle on the road above the hill on Thursday evening, and the occupants thrown out. The carriage sustained some injury, and Mr. BOVEY, sen., was much shaken by the fall, but we are happy to say no bones were broken. Mr. J. BOVEY, by whom the carriage was driven, luckily escaped with only a bruise or two.

METEOR. – A magnificent meteor was observed falling in a south westerly direction on Wednesday evening about 8 o’clock. It illuminated the streets, and looked exactly like a huge rocket. It was observed for nearly five seconds.

MILITARY. – We understand that Col. TIRLEY of the C.M.R. has recently received instructions from the Commander of the Forces to proceed from Fort Beaufort to K. W. Town and other stations for the purpose of inspecting the various detachments of his corps. It is said, he will proceed to Natal with a like object.

Saturday, May 14, 1864

MUSIC.
Mr. J. C. HUNE, Pianoforte Tuner, &c., &c., begs to offer his services in the above line, to the inhabitants of Fort Beaufort and neighbourhood. Orders left at O’GARA’s Hotel, Fort Beaufort, will be promptly attended to.
May 12, 1864.

FARRIERY.
The Undersigned begs to inform the public that he has commenced the business of Farrier on the premises of Mr. VALENTINE Campbell Street.
W. ELLIOT.

SALE OF VALUABLE LANDED PROPERTY.
Mr. E. BUCKLEY being about to remove from Fort Beaufort, has instructed the Undersigned to sell by Public Auction on the spot on Wednesday, 25th Inst., that valuable and commodious dwelling house, situate in Henrietta-street,
There are convenient outhouses, good stabling, and nice little garden, - the whole securely enclosed by stone walls. The entire premises are in a thorough state of repair. As a central and comfortable family residence, it is unsurpassed. The Market is in full view.
A liberal credit will be given.
Sale to commence at 12 o’clock precisely.
S. H. ROBERTS
Auctioneer.
13th May, 1864.

TO LET.
1 – The Farm “Howse Post,”
On the Kat River, between Leeuw Fontein and Alice, and one of the best farms in the District.
2 – The Farm “Peffer’s Kop,”
In the Chumie, A first rate Agricultural farm.
3 – The Farm “De Waal’s Kloof,”
Lately occupied by Mr. T. THARRATT, well adapted for raising good crops.
Rents low and possession at once.
Apply to R. W. H. GIDDY.

FOR PRIVATE SALE,
The house and lands near Stanton’s Drift, occupied by Clarke MORRIS, Esq., C.M.R. The House and Garden are in good order. As the proprietor is about leaving the Colony, he offers this property at a very low sum, and on terms extending over several years. Apply to R. W. H. GIDDY.

GRAND RIFLE SHOOTING MATCH.
To be shot for at Fort Beaufort, on Tuesday the 24th Instant, the Queen’s Birth Day.
First Match,
1st Prize – A splendid Double-Barrel Rifle, by Bourne,Warronted to carry 2000 yards. Value, 25 Guineas.
2nd Prize – A first-rate double barrel Fowling piece, cost in London Ten Guineas.
3rd Prize – Three Sovereigns.
Thirty Subscribers at 1 Guinea each.
Three shots at 200 yards, - three shots at 300 yards.
Second Match.
1st Prize – An erf of Ground, Situated in Durban Street, near the premises lately occupied by Mr. W. KENT, value £25.
2nd Prize – A thorough good shooting Pony, saddle, & Bridle, value £12 10s.
3rd Prize – A good Double-barrel Fowling piece, value eight guineas.
Thirty-five subscribers at one guinea each.
Number of shots and distances the same as first match.
A list where Subscribers can enter their names will lie at O’GARA’s Royal Hotel, where the different prizes, with the exception of the piece of ground, may be seen. Any Subscriber to be at liberty to take one or more tickets. Shooting to commence at ½ past 10 precisely.
N.B. – Distances may be altered if desired by the majority of subscriber.

MISCELLANEOUS.

KAFFRARIA. – (Extract of a private letter) – “I am very sorry to see your colony in so deplorable a mess, up to its chin in debt. It will require a great deal of taxation to bring ye all right again. We Kaffrarians are going along well here just now. Notwithstanding the Governor is giving us the cold shoulder in every way he can, we are prospering. K. W. Town has made great progress even within the past 15 months that I have been resident here. The place is increasing in size, and many of the new arrivals have built beautiful and substantial stores. I must say that the majority of the people here appear to take a great deal more interest in politics than those of the old colony, I admire them for their perseverance and unity in public matters.”

SALE OF PROPERTY. – The hotel property situated in D’Urban street, belonging to the insolvent estate of G. WALSH, was purchased at public auction on Wednesday last by Mr. F. GODDARD, for £690 at a credit of three years.

CRADOCK. – Judgement was given against the sureties of BUTLAND, at the Circuit Court, for the amount of the bond, £150, which they had signed on his behalf to keep the peace for six months.

SENTENCE OF DEATH. – Two Kafirs have been sentenced to the extreme penalty of the law, at Cradock, for the murder of a Kafir woman and her child, under superstitous influences.

BRITISH KAFFRARIA. – From the population returns, &c., just published it appears that the native population of British Kaffraria on the 31st Dec. 1863, was 86,012, being an increase on the year of 6,012. The European population exclusive of military, on the 31st Dec. 1863 amount to 8,142 souls. The number of guns in the possession of natives was 3020; wagons, 425; ploughs, 866; horses 4233; cattle 44,855; sheep, 48,992; goats, 104,215; amount of hut tax collection in 1863 £3275, being £1998 less than was estimated.
The number of horses in possession of Europeans was 1992; cattle 20,885; sheep 270,630; goats, 29,144. Number of grantee farms 310, number of European adults resident on farms 2390; natives, women and children, on farms 3268.

OPENING OF PARLIAMENT. – We have had the pleasure of inspecting some really capital photographs of the opening of Parliament, taken by Mr. Charles JAY, of Grahamstown – the only artist in the city, we believe, who succeeded in photographing the interesting event. There are three or four views, one stereoscopic, taken from a well chosen position opposite Shaw College, which conveys a vivid idea of the reality to those who were not fortunate enough to be present. The moment of His Excellency’s arrival in front of the college stands out well, and the whole of the figures are remarkably distinct. The views are first class, and will no doubt be valuable as a memento of the first, if not last, Parliament held in the city of the settlers. We shall be happy to receive the names of persons wishing to subscribe for copies of these views.

DISGUSTING BRUTALITY. – The Overberg Courant publishes an instance of almost incredible brutality, on the part of a man named Mathys TALJAARD. This miscreant was driving a wagon drawn by six horses, and one of the animals (a mare,) gave symptoms of great distress, being in fact about to drop a foal. The wretch, however, plied his whip unmercifully in spite of remonstrance, and on reaching the top of a neighboring hill came to a momentary pause, during which he drew out from between the legs of the horse the dead foal dropped by the mare, and immediately drove on again. The excuse given by the inhuman brute for his atrocious conduct was that it was near sun down, and that he could not stop to span out the mare as he wished to save the extra toll! The law it seems only authorises a fine of £1, for such cruelty and as the cost of serving a summons on TALJAARD, would amount to more than that sum, he was allowed to go unpunished by the authorities, to whom the circumstance was reported.

Dr. WHITE has been brought forward as candidate to contest the vacancy in the Council, with Mr. VIGNE.

POSTSCRIPT.
THE ROADS BILL has been read a second time. In the course of the debate Mr. PAINTER went a little out of his way to have a slap at the Fort Beaufort Divisional Council, which he asserted had to his knowledge acted from private pique. He had not hesitation in saying that to his knowledge, one Council – he did not mind mentioning the name; he meant the Fort Beaufort Council – had acted from private feeling and pique, in order to injure an innocent man. Make these bodies more honest – let them be elected as the Parliament is – and Somerset, junior, might agree to hand over to them the maintenance of the main roads. Strange to say, Mr. AYLIFF, the member for Fort Beaufort, thought and said that the very Council referred to by Mr. PAINTER, was composed of as just and upright men as the country would produce.

MUSTER OF GRANTEES
Stockenstrom.
The Grantees of Land in this Division are hereby called upon, in conformity with the conditions of Grant, to muster, Armed and Mounted, At Eland’s Post, on Wednesday May 25, 1864, at 11 o’clock, a.m., under their respective Field Cornets.
J. Reid LAING.
Actg. Civil Commissioner,
Stockenstrom.
Civil Com.’s Office.
Eland’s Post,
May 8, 1864.

Saturday, May 21, 1864

MISCELLANEOUS.

ACCIDENT. – On Monday afternoon, Mr. BRANDFORD and farrier, was thrown from a horse on the flat below the town, and sustained a fracture of the skull. Dr. BENBOW was fortunately near at hand, and rendered all the assistance possible. The unfortunate man lies in a very precarious state.

M.P.’s. – On Saturday last several members of Parliament, taking advantage of the holiday on Whit Monday, paid a flying visit to Fort Beaufort. The Hon’ble van BREDA, M.L.C., Auditor General COLE, and Messrs MUNNIK, HUMAN, HIDDINGH, and CAUVIN, were the names of the gentlemen who did Fort Beaufort the honor of paying it a visit; and we believe they were all agreeably surprised to find a flourishing town, where a few years ago only a military outpost, existed. They returned on Monday morning.

ADVOCATE COLE and BARRY, passed through this place on Monday on their way to Grahamstown, to take their seats.

THE QUEEN’S BIRTHDAY. – There is to be a grand ball at Government House, Grahamstown on the 24th. The C.M.R. Band left to-day for the city to perform on the occasion. It will return on Friday next.

CAPE BRANDY. – The Attorney General in his speech in favor of the Government Customs bill, said that it would be impolite to increase the duty on foreign wines and spirits, because people would readily abandon their use for colonial wines and spirits and the revenue suffer accordingly. Good old Cape brandy was, he said, better than the spirits imported from Europe, and far superior to any he had tasted in France.

TICKETS OF CITIZENSHIP. – It was a good proposition made by Mr. Jonathan AYLIFF last week, that tickets of citizenship should be taxed. The select committee on the Stamp Bill were empowered to include these tickets in the bill.

WE HAVE RECEIVED the first number of the Kaffrarian published at East London. We wish the proprietor success, and trust that the Kaffrarian public will have sufficient public spirit, to preserve it from the fate of its predecessor the “Recorder.”

EAST LONDON. – Since the re-commencement of the harbour works, now little more than six weeks, 103 feet of wall have been added to the breakwater at the eastern side of the mouth of the river. During the last month not less than 18,200 cubic feet of stone were tilted; which figures are sufficient proof that the work is progressing favourably. The sand is already beginning to bank up behind the outer side of the wall, this will add to its strength and durability. – Kaffrarian.

A RICH JOKE. – A circumstance is currently reported to have recently taken place, which has caused considerable merriment amongst the general public. A few days ago the Legal Advisor of the Crown in these territories, with his family, proceeded to a certain hotel in one of the outlying districts, for a month we believe, for the purpose of recruiting their health, and of course took with them all things necessary for their comfort and convenience . They had not, however, been many days there, when lo! The Sheriff’s officer made his appearance with a writ against the proprietor of the hotel, and as the office had orders to attach everything he could find upon the premises, he attached, as it said, everything belongging to the Attorney General and his family. Remonstrance was of no avail – the officer pleaded his order to attach everything, and the result was that our “honourable friend” had like other people placed in similar circumstances to make the usual affidavit in order to release his property. Of course the public enjoy the joke. – K. W. T. Gazette.

THE CURSES OF THE CAPE. – The Attorney-General says: “I have always considered that among the curses of Capetown are snoek and rice. I have always looked upon it that as long as out labouring people there – I am not now speaking of domestic servants who are supported by their masters, and upon which masters these taxes will fall as far as servants’ rations are concerned. – I am speaking of the jobbing men, the piece workers. I have always considered that while snoek and rice are plentiful that for two days work a man can get sufficient to supply his wants for a week, the country will lose the benefit of give days labour which he is perfectly able to render, and the man himself will be subject to temptations which, under such circumstances, it is obvious that he will be unable to resist.”

ARRIVAL OF THE MAIL STEAMER “SAXON”
List of passengers per R.M.S Saxon:
Lieut. CLEGG, Mrs. CLEGG and infant;
Mr. ROBERTSON;
Mr. PHELPS;
Mr. LINSWAY;
Mr. S. J. WARD;
Mr. Thomas ELLIOT, Mrs. ELLIOT, and infant;
Mr. GORDON, Mrs. GORDON, and infant;
Mrs. ROBERTSON;
Lieut. WILSON, Mrs. WILSON, and infant;
Mrs. BATES;
Mrs. ROBINSON;
Mr. MEYERS;
Mr. C. W. CLAPP;
Mr. HAMELBERG;
Sergeant DUNBAR, Mrs. DUNBAR, and infant;
Mr. HASSELTON;
Dr. J. SHERLEY;
Lieut. BYNG;
Miss JERMAN;
Mr. BIGNOLD.

POSTSCRIPT.

IMPORTANT CHANGES. – Very important alterations are forthwith to be made in the distribution of the military. We have learned on good authority that His Excellency the Commander-in-Chief will leave Table Bay in the Valorous about the 1sr of June, for Natal, taking with him the 11th Regt. From the Cape, a wing of which will be landed at East London. The Valorous , with the Commander-in-Chief will then proceed to Natal, land the other wing of the 11th, and embark the 5th Regt., which will be brought down and disembarked at East London, where the Valorous will take on board the 10th, and convey it to Cape Town. The distribution of the forces will be as follows: -
10th Regt. At Cape Town,
11th Regt. At Maritzburg and East London,
5th Regt. At K. W. Town,
96th Regt. head quarters Grahamstown,
3 companies at Fort Beaufort
C.M. Rifles to be removed to K. W. Town, a few men left in Fort Beaufort.
Head Quarters in chief to be at K. W. Town where His Excellency the Commander of the Forces will take up his residence.
Lt. Governor MACLEAN has been appointed Lieutenant Governor of Natal.
The Hon. Rawson RAWSON, our Colonial Secretary, has been appointed Governor of the Bahamas.

NOTICE.
The undersigned hereby gives notice to Garrett WALSH that unless the rent due on the house leased to him, is paid within 21 days from the date hereof, the goods contained therein, will be sold by auction to defray the same.
Anne FARRELL
Fort Beaufort,
May 19, 1864.

Saturday, May 28, 1864

MISCELLANEOUS.

THE QUEEN’S BIRTH DAY. – The 24th of May passed off very quietly this year compared with last year. It was anything but Queen’s weather on Tuesday, which was one of the gloomiest, dullest, most uncomfortable days, imaginable. The troops in garrison assembled, at noon under Col. TINLEY, and after firing a feu de joie, returned to barracks. About 1 o’clock a drizzling rain came on, and compelled every one otherwise disposed, to seek for amusement in doors.

RIFLE MATCH. – The Rifle matches, advertised for Tuesday, were damped by the weather. There was but a small number of competitors for the valuable prizes, - some being prevented from taking part by the threatening aspect of the clouds, and other at a distance by being obliged to attend the muster of grantees in Stockenstrom and elsewhere. One of the matches, however, came off under unfavourable circumstances, competitors having to fire one half the shots under a smart rain. The first prize, a pony, with saddle and bridle, was won by Mr. J. D. INGRAM, of Victoria.
The second prize, a valuable fowling piece was won by Mr. W. PEDLAR on Mr. N. ELLIOT’s ticket; and the third prize, three sovereigns, was also won by Mr. Pedlar, on the ticket of Mr. I. N. HOLDEN.

COLONIAL MANUFACTURED SAUCE. – We have tasted a sample of sauce manufactured by Mr. G. JUBBER, confectioner of this town, which is quite equal to the bulk of that imported, and would on trial be preferred by most people. It is pleasant and piquant to the taste, provocative to the appetite and wholesome, - which is more than can be said of nine tenths of imported condiments. It is also we believe cheaper in price.

MILITARY MAIL. – Orders have again been issued to discontinue the Military mail to and from Grahams Town. This we believe, is in consequence of the contemplated changes in the military forces, which will necessitate the concentration of the C.M. Rifles. The public will lose a great convenience by the discontinuance of this mail.

MILITARY. – One troop of the C.M. Rifles, it is supposed will remain in Fort Beaufort, one troop in Grahams Town, one troop, with head quarters in K. W. Town, and the remainder of the Corps be sent to the Trans Kei.

SALE OF LANDED PROPERTY. – On Wednesday last Mr. S. H. ROBERTS sold by auction, the premises of Mr. E. BUCKLY, in Henrietta street. There was spirited competition for the house which was knocked down to the Rev. Mr. O’ CONNELL for the sum of £445, at a credit extending over five years, bearing interest at 8 per cent. The price is considered a very good one.

RATHER SHARP PRACTICE. – The following was told to use a few days since: A boer came into town some time since with a number of Springboks which he had shot with the intention of selling them. On entering the tow he met with a certain limb of the law, informed him that he had brought some Springboks for sale, and enquired where there was a likelihood of selling them, and what price would they realize. “Oh Yes!” said the limb of the law,” you will readily get rid of them at eight shillings each. “You may send one up to my house.” The boer sent one up to his house, and sold the remainder to different persons. Shortly after, much to the Boer’s astonishement, he received a bill from the limb of the law “for legal advice” 7s. & 6d, and 6d. in cash, as the balance of the payment for the Springbok. This certainly is a new mode of obtaining an eight shilling springbok. – Colesberg Advertiser.

A FACT. – A memorial was sent to the Volksraad some time back and was read to that honourable body on the 27th Feb. last, requesting them to pass an ordinance making it compulsory that the officials and lawyers in future be God-fearing men. This precious document bore the signatures of R. D. van WIJK and twenty others. Bad as some people imagined the Raad to be, we need not say that they treated the memorial as it deserved. – Friend.

POSTSCRIPTS.

TOBACCO. - £25,000 worth of tobacco in bond at Port Elizabeth is about to be sent back to America and England, there being no demand for it.

INSOLVENCY DECLARED. – Andrew William BECK, of Grahamstown; Assets, £9291 15s.; liabilities, £10,144; deficiency, £852 5s.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL. – A proclamation in yesterday’s Gazette announces that the election of a member of the Legislative Council in the place of the late Mr. Joseph CAWOOD will be held on the 20th of next month.

SALE OF PROPERTY. – Last week Mr. WILMORE’s house and ground were sold in Grahamstown for £735. On Tuesday a property was peremptorily sold under process of the Supreme Court, sold for £435.

SMUGGLING. – Tobacco and gin are being smuggled on shore at Port Elizabeth: - defrauding customs. Guns and ammunition from America are re-shipped in Algoa Bay and brought into the native territories by the way of St. John’s and other rivers. – Great Eastern.

MR. W. H. CRAVES, assistant cashier Port Elizabeth Bank, has been appointed to succeed the late Mr. GREENWAY, as Cashier to the Aliwal North branch of the Frontier Commercial and Agricultural Bank.

WAR-OFFICE, MARCH 29.
96th Foot: Lieut. Alexander Bruce TULLOCH, from 1st Foot to be captain, by purchase, vice Frederick HENNIKER, who retires.
Medical Department: Assistant-Surgeon Henry KNAGGS, from the Cape Mounted Riflemen, to be Staff Assistant0Surgeon, vice John MACARTNEY, deceased.
Cape Mounted Riflemen: Captain and Brevet-Major Thomas HARE to be Major, without purchase, vice Brevet-Colonel John ARMSTRONG, placed upon half-pay on appointment as Colonel on the Staff; Lieutenant Edward Alexander LYNAR to be Captain, without purchase, vice Brevet-Major HARE; Ensign Charles James M. HALLEWELL to be Lieutenant without purchase, vice LYNAR.

NEWS FROM THE INTERIOR. – By the Flower of Yarrow, which arrived in Table Bay yesterday we have received later news from Damaraland. The vessel left Walwich Bay on the 8th of May, and a day or two previous to this Messrs. GREEN and Richard HAYBITTLE had arrived from Otjimbinque with the intelligence that Mr. ANDERSON’s cattle, to the number of about 1,500, had been swept off by the Hottentots under the command of Jan JONKER, and ten of Mr. ANDERSON’s party had been killed, including an old servant, named John AFRICANDER, his wife and two children. Mr. ANDERSSON was at Otjimbinque, and would probably place himself at the head of the Damaras, who mustered about 2,000 men, for the purpose of resenting the outrage, and regaining possession of the cattle. It was probable that Mr. F. GREEN would also assist in the expedition. The Hottentots were at a spot about one hundred miles from Otjimbinque, but the extent of the force was not known. Mrs. CHAPMAN, who left Cape Town a short time since, was joined at Walwich Bay by her husband, and was travelling towards Otjimbinque when the intelligence was received of the outbreak, and the place of their operations was changed.
Mrs. CHAPMAN returned to Walwich Bay, busily occupied in painting. Owing to the disturbed state of the country, trading was put an almost entire stop to. The wagons of Messrs. WILSON and HIGGS were at Hykomkop. – Argus.

ON SUNDAY last three horses were struck dead by lightning on the farm of Mr. G. M. RADEMEYER, Swartfontein. – Somerset Courant.

Saturday, June 4, 1864

MISCELLANEOUS.

MILITARY. – Twenty-five men of the C.M. Rifles started on Sunday morning for East London on their way to Natal. On Monday morning a troop of the same Corps left for K. W. Town. The Military Mess here has been broken up in anticipation of a speedy removal of the C. M. R.

INSPECTION. – In consequence of the intelligence received from the Kei, a general inspection of all the troops in garrison was held on Saturday last, - and everything put in trim for immediate service, should the necessity arise to take the field.

MAGISTRATE’S COURT. – The thieves of the cattle advertised in this paper for the last two or three weeks, have been apprehended, and committed; and the cattle claimed by the owner. The supposed thieves are three Hottentots, who stole the cattle from a farmer named ZWART, of Bruintzes Hoogte, Somerset.

CAUTION. – Complaints have been made this last week, that parties in the town are in the habit of incautiously discharging loaded fire-arms in the town, thereby endangering the lives of the inhabitants. One party resident in D’Urban Street, was very nearly struck by a bullet thus carelessly fired, while standing in the street at dusk the other evening. The shot struck only a yard from where he was standing. Discharging fire-arms in the town is penal according to the Municipal Regulation.

ALIWAL NORTH. – The Burghersdorp Gazette says that at the Circuit Court held at this place the prosecution was conducted by L. H. MEURANT, Esq., who made his debut as Clerk of the Peace to persecute. The bare facts of the case were concisely laid by him before the Jury and supported by evidence afterwards adduced.

THE JUBILEE of the Wesleyen Methodist Society was held in this town on Monday last. The Rev. Mr. IMPEY from Graham’s Town, Rev. Mr. HEPBURN from K. W. Town, and many other ministers from various parts attended to take part in the various services.

FIRE. – We regret to hear that on Friday week the house of Mr. C. RORKE of the Winterberg was totally destroyed by fire. We have not heard how the fire originated. We believe the property was uninsured, an unfortunate circumstance for the owner. Another place in the Winterberg had a narrow escape from destruction by fire last week.

ROBBERY. – On Sunday last, while Mr. and Mrs. CAHILL were at church, a £10 note, was stolen. A Kafir woman, a servant in their employ, is the suspected thief, and is now in prison.

LAMENTABLE DEATH. – The Somerset Courant, says that the dead body of Mr. G. WALSH, a well known resident of Fort Beaufort, has been found near Somerset, and identified by the clothing worn by the deceased. The Courant some w3eeks ago announced that deceased was seen wandering in the veldt; in the Bruintjes Hoogte, in a state of unsound mind, and that every effort was made by those who saw him to bring him to town, but unsuccessfully. We can hardly credit that much interest was felt in the condition of the unfortunate lunatic, or means would have been found to bring him to the public hospital, or even to lodge him in gaol. If it had been a wild ox that had been seen wandering in the veldt, he would probably have been sent to the pound, and we think at least as much interest might have been shown in regard to a human being in a state of unsound mind. It reflects discredit on Somerset, and particularly on the officials, that no steps were taken to look after the deceased, and that official action satisfied itself with holding a post-mortem examination on his bleached bones. The son of deceased arrived the day after the discovery of his remains for the purpose of bringing his father home in a cart. He had searched the country round, but could find no trace of his father, and at last called on the district Surgeon, when he learned that the doctor had the previous day been called to examine what had once been the body of a man, but which turned out to be the remains of Mr. WALSH. If anyone wants to know where the Good Samaritan lives, we would recommend that application be made at the town of Somerset.

WRECK. – The bark Grahamstown, Capt. WALE, from Alogoa Bay arrived yesterday with cargo on fire, which originated in the after hatch, 18 days ago, when she was 300 miles North of the Cape. When she came into this port, the deck was so hot as to be almost unbearable, and after vainly trying to extinguish the fire the Captain slipped his cable, and ran the vessel ashore near the military hospital. An hour or two after the fire burst out in flames, which gradually extented over the vessel, destroying everything. She is now a perfect wreck. The insurances in Cape Town offices only amount to £2,500. There is £8000 on cargo insured in a Scottish office. Captain, crew, and passengers all safe. An insurance Company in Grahamstown, it is said, loses £3000 on the cargo if the vessel.

MELANCHOLY ACCIDENT. – A most melancholy accident happened to Mr. John WALDEK and family on Wednesday last. On that day he left Queenstown for his own home in a spider, accompanied by his wife, two children, and wife’s sister. Reaching the Zwaart Kie drift by Mr. van GASS’s farm, below its junction with the Klipplaat, he did not observe that the river was high, the water being so clear, until he had nearly reached the opposite bank, then the off horse put his head under water, and must have become entangled in the disselboom, as he could not get up again. The other horse began plunging, Mr. W. finding he could not reach the bank, turned the horses heads down the stream, and made for an island about 50 yards down the river. When near the island, the current was so strong that it upset the spider, precipitating Mr. and Mrs. W. and infant into the water. Mrs. W. clinging to her husband an infant. On rising to the surface Mr. W. threw the child on the bank, and then with great difficulty succeeded in placing Mrs. WALDEK by its side. On looking round to his horror he found that his spider with Mrs. W.’s sister and eldest child had disappeared. Mr. and Mrs. Van GASS were immediately on the spot and up to late at night every effort was made to find the spider with its living freight without avail. The next day Mr. van GASS, Mr. KIDSON, M. HART and other neighbours were again on the spot, but on this and two following days without result. By Sunday a punt had been made so as to drag the large seacow holes with more care, in one of them the body of Mrs. WALDEK’s sister was found by Mr. KIDSON and young WINDELL close to the spider fast under a tree. The infant has not yet been recovered. The Rev, Mr. DUGMORE proceeded to the farm of Mr. van GASS, early this morning to perform the last ceremony before the body is committed to its final resting place. – Free Press.

THE VACANT SEAT IN THE COUNCIL. – The election for the vacant seat in the Council for the East is notified by Proclamation in the Gazette of the 20th May, to take place on the 20th day of June next. The candidates are Henry Bailey CHRISTIAN, Esq., and William COCK, Esq. The scrutineers appointed are George WOOD, jun., Esq., John George FRANKLIN, Esq., to act with C. H. HUNTLY, Esq.

ACCIDENT. – We regret to hear that a sad accident occurred to Mr. WARDLE, cashier of the Uitenhage branch of the Standard Bank, on Wednesday last. He was out riding when his horse shied and threw him. He came down head foremost, and received severe injuries. He is now lying in a dangerous state. – Telegraph.

NEW APPOINTMENT. – His Excellency the Governor has been pleased to appoint Arthur TWEED, Esq., to be justice of the peace for the district of Fort Beaufort, and a commissioner for examining the protocols and registers of the notaries public in the division of Fort Beaufort, vice Thomas James RORKE, Esq., resigned;
Adam Gabriel de SMIDT, Esq., to be jsutice of the peace for the districts of Stockenstrom, Fort Beaufort, and Queen’s Town; and
Mr. Charles BRETT to be assistant field-cornet of the ward Lower Bushman’s River, in the division of Albany, in the room of Mr. J. J. BAINES, resigned.

OFFICIAL CHANGES. – It is now positively stated, on what we believe to the the best authority, that Mr. RAWSON is to have the Government of the Bahama Islands. At all events, the offer has been made to him by the last mail from England; and there is but little doubt that he will readily accept it. The salary has been £2000 a year but is to be raised to £3000; and with Nassau as its capital, during the continuance of the America War the position will be of much importance. That Mr. RAWSON merits promotion of this sort, and that he needs the comparitive rest of such a Government after the labours of the past ten years, will b e readily acknowledged by all. Whatever differences of opinion may exist on matters of detail, even his strongest political opponents will admit that the Colonial Secretary hs worked faithfully and laboriously for what he believed to be the best interests of the colony. – Adv. & Mail.

SIR ANDS. STOCKENSTROM, BART. – The Illustrated London News gives the following notice of the late distinguished colonist: -
“Sir Andries STOCKENSTROM Bart. Of Maastroom, Cape of Good Hope, formerly Lieutenant-Governor of that colony, was of noble Swedish extraction, and was the eldest son (by his wife, Maria, daughter of John BROEDERS, Esq., of the Cape of Good Hope) of Andries STOCKENSTROM, Esq., of Stockholm (who afterwards settled at the Cape, and became Landdrost, or Chief Magistrate of Graaff Reinet). The STOCKENSTROM family was among the early pioneers of civilization on the borders of our South African possessions, and a melancholy interest attached to the fate of the deceased Baronet’s father, who, at the head of a body of colonial militia, was massacred by the natives of Kaffirland, Dec. 28, 1811. Andries the son, the subject of this notice, then in his nineteenth year, and an Ensign of the Cape Regiment, was immediately chosen to replace his father in the command of the brigade, and served throughout the war. At its conclusion he was appointed Deputy Landdrost of Cradock. In 1815 he became Landdrost of Graaff Reinet. In May, 1820, having commanded with distinction the colonial forces in connection with the British troops under General WILTSHIRE, he was raised to the rank of Captain of the English Army, and placed on half pay soon after. In 1828 he was appointed Commissioner-General of the frontier, which post he resigned in 1833. In 1834 he was recalled from seclusion in Sweden to occupy the post of Lieutenant-Governor of the Cape. On his retirement from that office he was raised, on March 13, 1840, to the dignity of a Baronet, as a reward ‘for his long and valuable services.’ In 1846, while at his seat on the frontier, eh was called upon to resume the command of the colonial forces during the Kafir War, and was made a colonel of the Staff of the English Army. His extraordinary exertions and self-denial, and the hardships he suffered during this war, completely shattered his constitution. He was afterwards summoned to Cape Town as a member of the Legislative Council.
In 1859 he was deputed, together with Mr. FAIRBRAIN to demand a constitution for the colony from the Home Government. Having been successful in his mission, he was elected by a vast majority to represent, with six others, the Eastern Province of the colony in the Council, of Upper House. Failing health compelled him to retire in March, 1856. The remainder of his days he has spent in Europe, with the exception of a short visit to the Cape in 1860. The evening of a most laborious and useful career was marked by extreme physical suffering. The immediate cause of death was chronic bronchitis, contracted during his campaigns. He expired, on the 15th ult., at 37, Talbot Terrace, Bayswater, in the seventy-second year of this age, and was interred at Kensal-green on the 22nd ult. Sir Andries married, Dec. 8, 1828, Elsabe Helena, daughter of Gysbert Henry MAASDORP, of the Cape of Good Hope, and had issue two sons and three daughters: of the latter, the eldest daughter, Elizabeth Maria Henrietta, was married, March 11th, 1862, to Charles William HUTTON Esq., second son of the Rev. Henry HUTTON, Rector of Bucklandcum-Filleigh, Devon; and the second daughter Maria Susanna, was married, Jan. 19th 1864, to Sidney Godolphin Alexander SHIPPARD, Esq. Sir Andries is succeeded by his elder son, now Sir Gysbert Henry STOCKENSTROM, the second Baronet, who was born March 11, 1841, and is an officer in the 61st Foot.”
Dr. MAASDORP and C. W. HUTTON, Esq of Bedford, are the executors of the late Sir Andries STOCKENSTROM, Bart. His pension of £700 per annum will lapse to the colony.

A STRANGE PROCCEDING, IF TRUE. – Yesterday morning a herd, living in a hut near WYATT’s Mills, and in the employ of Mr. MATTHEWS, at the Quarry, gave information to the following effect: - On Monday morning he saw a very large ship, (probably a steamer), without masts, come quite close to land, despatch a boat to shore, from which several sailors landed, the boat putting back again to the ship, which left at once, leaving the men behind them. They came to his hut, and supplied them with water, but could not understand what they said, as they did not speak English. They were foreigners, dressed like sailors, and appeared to have been cut and wounded in several places. When they left, they went in the direction of the lighthouse. Mr. MATTHEWS, the man’s employer, confirmed this statement so far as to saying that the herd came at once to him and told him of the event. Upon receiving this intelligence Mr. CAMPBELL despatched a man on horseback, to trace the spoor of the party, if any existed; but he had not returned at the time of our going to press. Mr. CAMPBELL and several other gentlemen rode out to the spot this morning, to make further enquiries. It is supposed from the man saying the vessel he saw had no masts, that the ship must have been the American steamer Moyung, which passed here on Monday morning, is brigrigged, and has two tiers of cabins on her deck. A sailing ship was also observed to pass about the same time.

POSTSCRIPT.

Mr. L. H. MEURANT, C.C. of Cradock, we have been informed, has been appointed to succeed Mr. STRINGFELLOW, as Civil Commissioner and Resident Magistrate of this District. Mr. MEURANT takes over the duties in August.

SHOCKING TRAGEDY. – A man named D. KIRWAN, residing at Oudtshoorn killed his wife in a sudden fit of anger and jealousy, by stabbing her in the neck with a table knife as they were sitting at breakfast. It appears a man named STIRLING had seduced KIRWAN’s wife, and the latter instead of expressing contrition for the offence, taunted her husband with her quilty love, when the latter on the spar of the moment seized a knife and struck the woman in the neck, of which wound she died in a few hours.

THE HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY have at last come to the conclusion that a census of the colony is necessary for the purposes of just and effective legislation. The cost is estimated at £5000.

WHISKEY. – A very excellent sample of whiskey has bee distilled at Fort Jackson by Mr. STEVENSON, as an experiment.

BREWERY. – Mr. E. W. GILSTAIN has just established a brewery in K. W. Town, and has succeeded, we believe, in producing beer of a superior quality.

THE ELECTRIC TELEGRAPH. – The line between this town and East London is now, we understand, so far completed; that the manager is only waiting for suitable offices to set it in full active operation, after which the wires will be carried on to Fort Beaufort, and ultimately to Graham’s Town. – K. W. T Gazette.

A CHASE AFTER STRANGE VISITORS. – In our last issue we notices the statement made to the Magistrate by a herd in the employ of Mr. MATTHEWS, living near WHATT’s mills, tha on Monday morning last, about seven o’clock, he saw a large steamer come close in shore at Chelsea Point and land a number of men, who afterwards called at his hut, one of them asking for coffee in English. On Wednesday afternoon Mr. CAMPBELL and several gentlemen went out to the spot, and found the spoor of the men as far as WYATT’s mill, where it was lost by reason of the grass and furze. Nothing could be seen of the men, however, on Friday afternoon, a Mrs. WILLIAMS, who lives a couple of miles out of the Bay, informed the Magistrate that the men called at her place that morning, and got some coffee. They came out of the bush. Special constables were sent out, Mr. CAMPBELL riding out soon after. About nine members of Capt. Du TOIT’s Company also went out in search of the strangers fully armed; they returned to town in the eveningm and being reinforce to the number of 30, valiantly set off again on their apparantly hopeless search, headed by their Captain. They remained out until 5 o’clock this morning (Saturday), beating about the bush, between here and Shark’s River, but without success. Ten special constables were engaged during the night with no better luck. There can be little dount but that the men are hiding in the bush; theu are supplied with biscuit, and if not caught before that fails them they must eventually come into the town. The Magistrate is determined to leave no means untried for their capture. We understand another part of volunteers are about to start in pursuit this morning. – Telegraph.

Saturday, June 11, 1864

MISCELLANEOUS

THE COMMISSIONERS on Tuesday evening were engaged in a conference with Mr. MANDY, on the subject of the water works, and have made arrangements which will enable them in a short time, it is to be hoped, to call for tenders for the undertaking. In a few days Mr. MANDY will commence marking out the line of the intended water furrow.

MILITARY. – Twenty men of the C.M. Rifles, with twenty led horses left for K. W. Town, on Wednesday.

CURE FOR SNAKE BITES. – Mr. SHONE, farmer, of this district, informs us that he has frequently cured persons bitten by venomous reptiles, by administering strong doses of the herb rue, and applying blue stone or spirits of turpentine externally. Mr. SHONE states that, during the past summer, several persons bitten by puffadders were in this manner successfully treated by him. If this be an effectual remedy – and we have no reason to doubt Mr. SHONE’s veracity – it is worthy of being universally made known. – Kaffrarian.

Col. TINLEY, C.M.R. left for K. W. Town on Tuesday last to be present at a Court of Inquiry to investigate some unpleasant matters which occurred at a Garrison Ball recently given in K. W. Town. A gallant officer of the C.M. Rifles had been placed under arrest by a senior officer, but we understand public sympathy is entirely in favor of the C.M.R. officer. The fair fame of some fair ladies is said to be implicated, and it was in defence of those ladies, against whom unworthy imputations are said to have been groundlessly made, that the officer was placed under arrest. It is said that a crop of lawsuits is likely to arise, and that public subscriptions are being collected, to defend the innocent and punish the slanderers.

A DEPUTATION waited upon T. STRINGFELLOW, ESQ., C.C. on Wednesday last, to invite him to a public dinner, previous to his retiring from the civil service, as a mark of appreciation for past services, and of the esteem of the inhabitants of the district. Mr. STRINGFELLOW appeared to be deeply affected by the good will of the people, which prompted this testimony of their regard, and expressed the gratification which he felt after so many years connection with the town and district in an official capacity, to find that his efforts to discharge his duties had been so highly appreciated.
He would have been most happy to have met the inhabitants at a public dinner, did his health allow him, but the excitement of a public dinner was more than his constitution could stand with impunity, and he therefore felt compelled to decline the intended honor. At the same time he took occasion to observe that he would continue to reside in Fort Beaufort, and that he would feel a pleasure on all occasions in co-operating with the people by every means in his power, in all matters having for their object the promotion of the interests of the town and district. We believe arrangements are being made to present the worthy Magistrate with some token of respect, in lieu of a dinner.

THE ESTATE of Casper TROSKIE of Somerset East has been sequestrated.

FIRE IN THE WINTERBERG. – A Correspondent writing from this place, says – “I am sorry to inform you that on Sunday night about 11o’clock the house of Mr. B. RORKE, Winterberg, and all the goods and property therein contained, were destroyed by fire, originating in an accident. About thirty muids of corn, mealies, barley, &c. besides all the furniture and clothing were burnt, - hardly a thing was saved. – One part of the house was occupied by Mr. Charles RORKE, who also lost everything, not being able to save his wife’s clothing. The fire occurring at night, and no assistance being at hand, the flames held undisputed sway until they had consumed everything. The neighbours were very kind to the Messrs. RORKE and families in their distress. The Rev. Mr. MEADEN and Mrs. ANNON, supplied the immediate want of the sufferers as far as they were able, - and a disposition was shown by all to contribute towards the mitigation of the calamity.”

AN ACCIDENT occurred at Graaff-Reinet during the firing of a salute at noon in honor of Her Majesty’s birthday, by which two constables were burnt, though not seriously. The powder was carelessly placed in an open bucket, and a spark exploded it suddenly. Sergeant EHRICH was burnt in the head, and another man more injured.

POSTSCRIPT.

DEP. ASST. COM. GEN. TAYLOR, we understand, will shortly leave Fort Beaufort for Port Elizabeth, to assume the charge of the Commissariat Department at the Station.

A FARM in the Gonubie district sold about two years ago by J. G. BERRY to Mr. BOWER for £2100, has just been purchased for Mr. SPRIGG for £1250.

MR. HUMAN, M.L.A., received last post intelligence of the death of his father. Mr. SILBERBAUER M.L.A., also received intelligence of the death of his only daughter.

ANNEXATION. – A correspondent says a memorial signed by J. G. SPRIGG, J.P., P. R. ERASMUS, J.P., and nearly one hundred Grantees of the Gonubie district, in favor of Annexation, is about to be presented to His Excellency the Governor. – Gazette.

ON DIT that an action for damages is about to be commenced against a certain officer or officers by the father of the two young ladies who were so grossly insulted and cruelly slandered at the Garrison Ball the other night. It is also rumoured that court-martials are pending over one or two subalterns of the R.A.R.E corps, under Arrest for assaulting, striking, or insulting superior officers of other corps. – Ib.

Saturday, June 18, 1864

TO THE FREE AND INDEPENDENT ELECTORS OF FORT BEAUFORT.
Gentlemen, - On Monday next you will be called upon to record your votes in order to return an Eastern Province representative to the Legislative Council. There are two candidates seeking your support, viz: - William COCK and H. B. CHRISTIAN. We ask you not to let the miserable jealousy of Port Elizabeth against Grahamstown have any influence in this contest, - that is not the real question, it is, whether we shall have a true and staunch supporter of the general interests of the Eastern Province in the Council; or a man whose strongest sympathies are with our opponents – the Western members. Mr. COCK is, as you are well aware, a thorough-going, well-tried Eastern man, who will vote with the Eastern representatives now in the Council, and who is without the narrow prejudices and jealousies of the Port Elizabeth candidate – he will represent the whole Province, and not merely a locality; and will be found at his post at all times when required. The cry has been raised of Grahamstown monopoly – was that the case (which we deny) – Can the inventors of the phantom absurdity point to any act of Grahamstown members inimicable to the interests of the Eastern Province? Is it not a fact stamped with the great impress of truth that all the Grahamstown members in both Council & Assembly have strongly and ably supported every measure of importance to the whole Province; while a Port Elizabeth man mainly assisted the Western members to defeat one of the most important measures of Eastern Province independence, viz: the Judicial Bill; and the Port Elizabeth member, with Mr. CHABAUD (also a Port Elizabeth man) endeavoured to defeat the Queenstown Bill by a side wind of privilege, the highly important measure to give us equality of representation. With these facts before the Electors, can they place the confidence of the representation in a Port Elizabeth man who has declared himself opposed to Eastern independence and reform? Mr. CHRISTIAN is of the Port Elizabeth Western party – the worst foe the Eastern Province has. Mr. COCK is of the united Eastern party without the prejudices of locality, or the narrow-mindedness which would sacrifice the welfare of the majority to the interests of the few. We, therefore, call upon you Electors of Fort Beaufort and District to record your votes for William COCK, and secure a renewal of the services of one who hitherto served us faithfully.
By order of the Graham’s Town Committee.
George WOOD, jr. Chairman.

MISCELLANEOUS.

REHABILITATION. – The estate of W. MCGLASHAN of Alice was released form sequestration on the 7th April.

ACCIDENT. – On Monday a Hottentot driver in the employ of Mr. E. NORTON, in jumping up on the disselboom slipped and fell, the front wheel passing over and smashing his ankle. The poor fellow is in the prison Hospital, and will probably have to suffer amputation of the leg.

ESCAPE OF A RASCAL. – The native Jacob TOMBELI, who recently while out on bail on a charge of theft, used his liberty to purloin a bale of wool from Mr. MCLASHAN has managed to escape. The manner was thus: - At the last circuit court, Jacob was convicted of the theft for which he had been bailed out and sentenced to four years penal servitude. The Magistrate sent him to the Katberg convict station to serve until he should be tried on the charge of wool stealing, in order to save the trouble and expense of bringing him from the Table Bay harbour works to undergo his trial. The Jacob, however, having pleaded guilty to the theft of wool, the Attorney General instructed the Magistrate to try and sentence him. Jacob therefore was brought from the Katberg, was tried and sentenced to the full penalty of two years. The Magistrate then hired two special native constables to take the prisoner to Algoa Bay, in order to his being conveyed to the breakwater works in Table Bay. The men arrived at the Sundays river pont with the prisoner, and were taken over, when they tendered sixpence each for pont fees for themselves, but refused or were unable to pay the required sixpence for the prisoner Jacob. The man in charge of the pont, didn’t care, prisoner or not, he must be paid for, and the two constables failing to supply the sixpence, the pont man ferried the whole lot back to the Eastern side, returning the shilling to the two constables and them to be off about their business. The constables then commenced to retrace their steps back for the sixpence to pay the pont man, and the same night while bivouacking in the bush, Mr. Jacob TOMBOLI gave his keepers the slip, and left them to pursue their homeward journey by themselves.

DIED, at Colesberg, on the 12th June, 1864, after a short and painful illness, from dysentery, Mr. James RICHARDSON. – Friends at a distance will please accept this notice.

Saturday, June 25, 1864

BIRTH, at Fort Beaufort, on 23d June, 1864, the Wife of Mr. John MCGILVREY, of a daughter.

MISCELLANEOUS.

L. H. MEURANT, Esq., C.C. of Cradock, has visited Fort Beaufort during the past week, for the purpose, we believe of making arrangements preliminarily to his succeeding to the magistracy of this district. Our present Magistrate will probably not hadn over the public officers until the end of August. Mr. MEURANT expressed himself agreeable surprised at the improvements perceptible in Fort Beaufort since his last visit to the town, some five years since. He lef for Cradock on Thursday, and will retirn in a few weeks.

THE HEALTH of the Civil Commissioner of Alice, H. CALDERWOOD, Edq., we regret to hear is so impaited that he intends shortly to retore from the service.

J. HUDSON, Esq., late Acting Clerk of the Peace here, has left for Cradock, where he has been appointed Acting Civil Commissioner.

CIGARS. – A German in the Winterberg is manufacturing cigars from tobacco grown on the Koonap. A sample of them may be seen in Mr. VIGNE’s store. They are well-made, and are said by smokers to be mild and of excellent flavor, requiring only age to mellow them. They are equal to nine-tenths of the cigars imported and can be sold at a price not greatly in excess of the cusoms duty now charged on Manillas. Smokers should by all means patronize these colonial cigars.

SALE OF PROPERTY. – On Wednesday Mr. KEYS property was sold by Mr. ESTMENT, and all that changed hands fetched fair prices. The house occupied by Mr. KEYS was sold at a short credit for £300. Mr. Peter CAMPBELL being the purchaser. This is under cost, but considering the times, is not a bad price. The furniture sold well, the articles being of good quality. A second-hand spider was knocked down at £50; a splendid pair id draught horses fethched £60. The colt “Argus” was sold for £60. Horse-flesh, however, was at rather a discount, the bidding for several fine animals not reaching the reserve. A good deal of landed property was offered at this sale but the biddings were languid, and not satisfactory.

CHANGES. – Fort Beaufort is losing several of its most enterprising townsmenm who will be missed. Mr. E. BUCKLEY has already left for Queen’s Town district, Mr. W. KEYS is about to follow in the dame direction, and others well-known and as highly respected inhabitants are expecting shortly to take a long farewell of the town. We hope their places will be filled by as worthy and public-spirited men.

MR. WILLIAM HARTLEY, the oldest British settler in Graham’s Town, died on Tuesday and was buried on Thursday last.

CIVIL SERVICE PROMOTION. – We learn that Mr. HOFMEYR, of the Assistant Surveyor-General’s Office, Graham’s Town has been appointed chief clerk in the Master’s Office, Cape Town.

SUPREME COURT.
(Before Mr. Justice BELL and Mr. Justice CLOETE.)
Thursday, June 9.
NETTLETON vs. KILPATRICK.
This was an ex parte application for a rule nisi, made by one of the executors of William KILPATRICK against his co-executor, the widow of the deceased, calling upon her to show cause why she should not be interdicted from further alienating the estate without the consent of the applicant. Mr. WATERMEYER, who was for the applicant, produced an affidavit by the latter stating that he in conjunction with the respondent was appointed executor and administrator of the estate of the late William KILPATRICK. That their appointment was confirmed by the Master, and letters of administration issued to them on the 5th of February, 1863. That shortly after the receipt of such letters of administration the deponent authorized a person named DEVELLING to proceed to the late residence of the deceased at Alice for the purpose of making an inventory of the assets, by which the respondent would not allow him to do. The affidavit further stated that the respondent had already realized about £1,000 of the estate, without paying the debts, and that she was habitually more or less in a state of intoxication.
A further affidavit from Mr. DEVELLING was put in, and a rule nisi was granted, returnable on the 12th of July, calling upon the respondent to show cause why she should note be restrained from making away with the assets of the estate.

SKETCHERS IN PARLIAMENT.
Great Eastern.
Alas poor BOYES! Again he had been exhibiting his folly in the House, and brought upon himself a well merited snubbing, which that generous old joker, Robert Mitford BOWKER, good naturedly shared with him. TRUTER, of Calvinia, is not the most judicious or the best of magistrates, nor is Mr. St. G BOYES the most judicious or the best of members. He is an ill-natured mischievous crotchety man, who would quarrel with his own thumbs. He appears to have a natural antipathy to officials, and labours under the delusion that it is his mission in life to put them down wherever they are. When in Calvinia, he labours incessantly to rid the place of its magistrate, as soon as he arrived in Cape Town he saw two Colonial Office clerks smoking in Government Garden, and came to the conclusion that Colonial Office clerks did nothing but smoke, so he set about putting them down. Before he had got far into that self-imposed task he wanted to knock the President of the Legislative Council on the head and drag the Speaker of the Assembly out of his seat. He served summonses upon everybody and everything: would capsize the Parliament, cut off the pound a day from every member, stop the travelling allowances, make them all come back to their homes and start afresh. He would have had the Governor recalled the Gazette reprinted, the increased taxes transferred form the Treasury to the pockets of the Cape Town merchants. He would trample officialism and everything with it under his feet, ride rough-shod over it as his great name=sake St. George did over the dragon. St. George BOYES, the member for Clanwilliam, would ride the high horse and poke his political spear into the sides of all the officials in the country, and ride back to his agency offices at Calvinia the hero of a thousand, aye ten thousand, official fights, enveloped in a kaross of official scalps. If the hon. Member had not counted without his host, there is no saying how great a hero he might have been. But the Colonial Clerks still smoke their mild havannahs, the Parliament still sits, the Speaker’s wig is not out of curl, nor is the President brained; and the Parliament declines even to admit the honourable member the mild consolation for his losses which he last requested. He is not even to sacrifice a magistrate. He had better to go home again, take to the elementary girls, and train them up in a way they should go.
The Council has not yet been accused of having intellectual nostrils, but there was an intellectual feast in that chamber on Thursday, which turned upon noses. The Hon. Geo. WOOD commenced it by snubbing the country banks whilst Mr. POTE’s Bank of Issue was under discussion. Mr. WOOD thinks that banks not city banks are mushroom banks governed by spawn, who do not read SMITH and the eminent authors. Mr. TUCKER said mushrooms usually grow in rich soil, and were not a bad sort of production when properly served-up. There was a time when Cape Town turned up its nose at a Grahamstown bank, and voted that mushroom, it being presumptuous for a mushroom place like Grahamstown to have a bank. But after a time Port Elizabeth thought it could manage a bank, and then Grahamstown turned up its nose at the Port Elizabeth Bank, and voted that a mushroom. Now Cape Town, Grahamstown, and Port Elizabeth have three turn-up noses, and think all banks not their banks must be mushrooms, and that those who cheat them are mushroom men, ignorant of SMITH, GILBERT and other authorities. Inhabitants of large towns are too apt to think that “we are the men, and wisdom will die with us.” All the members of the Council being city men, and directors of city banks go hat in hand soliciting the mushrooms to amalgamate. Yesterday the Council decided upon the motion of Mr. POTE, not to look at the Estimates for a whole week to come, and to let the Bank Note Tax Bill stand over for that time. Inspect if the Judicial Bill does not pass, and the Easterns cannot get justice, supplies will be brought into fairer relationship with Eastern demands. There is mischief in the wind, and the Westerns will not get off so easily as they are calculating upon.

POSTSCRIPT.

THE FARM “HOPEWELL,” will be sold by Mr. S. H. ROBERTS on Tuesday next.

SALE OF FARM AND STOCK. – On Thursday, Mr. S. H. ROBERTS held a sale at Cathcart Vale in the estate of the late William KILPATRICK. About £700 worth of stock was sold, the prices being highly satisfactory to the executors of the Estate. The attendance of buyers from all part was good.

ATTEMPT AT SUICIDE. – The intelligence has been received in Grahamstown of an attempt made by Mr. William KIRKWOOD, of KIRKWOOD & MACDONALD of Port Elizabeth, upon his own life. KIRKWOOD & MACDONALD is a mercantile firm of good standing, and Mr. William KIRKWOOD is much esteemed. It appears that has been suffering from illness for some time. He made an attempt on Sunday afternoon to cut his throat with a penknife. His wife caught hold of the knife and took it from him. He then seized upon a pair of scissors and jagged at his throat with them. He was still living when the mail left.

 THE ELECTION.

 

COCK

CHRISTIAN

Fort Beaufort

42

4

Blinkwater

3

0

Koonap

-

-

Winterberg

-

-

Adelaide

-

-

Kroome

-

-

Alice

36

0

Aberdeen

7

0

Eland’s Post

10

37

Readsdale

0

22

Phillipton

0

38

Balfour

6

26

Buxton

2

19

Up. Blinkwater

11

0

Up. Mankazana

1

14

L. Mankazana

12

0

Queen’s Town

59

32

Bower’s Fieldcornetcy

8

3

Zeiler’s            “

3

3

Pretorius        “

1

4

Graaff-Reinet

1

197

Graham’s Town

602

6

Masseys

13

9

Port Elizabeth

12

283

Uitenhage

8

98

 

JEREMIAH WILSON,
Baker, Pastry Cook, and Confectioner,
Campbell Street.
In the premises lately occupied by Mr. WINDELL.
All orders in the above line punctually and economically executed. –
Wedding Breakfasts, Wedding Cakes, &c., on the shortest notice. –
Fresh bread daily, of best quality.

THE WIDOW WILSON.
Having taken up her residence in Fort Beaufort, hereby tenders her services as Nurse, to the inhabitants of the town and district. The following testimonials from Professional Gentlemen, will render it unnecessary for her to speak of her competency: -
This is to certify that Mrs. WILSON has been employed as nurse to several of my patients, and I have reason to be perfectly satisfied with the manner in which her duties were performed. TO the patients I found her quiet, kind and attentive, and free from that tendency to officious and hurtful meddling, for which nurses generally are far too remarkable: always anxious to carry out any instructions I though necessary: of uniformly sober and temperate habits. I consider her well calculated to fulfil the duties of a good nurse.
E. ARCHER Dist. Surgeon.
Queenstown, Dec. 3, 1864.
Mrs. M. A. WILSON of this town, has under my superintendence attended several confinements as a nurse, to the general satisfaction of all parties. Her removal to recommend Mrs. W. most highly to all ladies requiring an experienced quiet nurse.
Queenstown, March 24, 1864.
M. F. KRANTZ, M.D.

FOR SALE.
A Good Sheep, Cattle, and Agricultural Farm,
Situated on Mancanzana, known as Groepe’s Kraal,
Measuring 1816 acres.
There is a good house & out-building on the same.
Water is led out which irrigates a large quantity of land.
There is also a good orchard.
This property is too well known for further comment;
it is near the Town of Adelaide. Particulars may be
known from
Mr. C. HOLLIDAY.
Fort Beaufort,
June 15, 1864.

FOR PRIVATE SALE.
The first-class farms “Winterberg Spruit” and “Rooy Krantz,”
Situate in the Winterberg, not far from Post Retief, at present occupied by Mr. Hendrik VILJOEN.
These farms are well known as the best in the Winterberg for agriculture or for sheep and all other stock, and are only offered for sale in consequence of the wish of the owner to remove to a Town.
A credit of 8 to 10 years will be given at six per cent per annum, and the farms will be solde at an unusually low figure.
The titles and diagrams, which are free and unincumbered, are to be seen at the residence of MR. VILJOEN on the farm Winterberg Spruit – and for further particulars apply to Mr. VILJOEN on the farm, or to Mr. GIDDY, Fort Beaufort.
Fort Beaufort, 14 June, 1864.

 

 

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